Vitamin D V.S. Colorectal Cancer

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Scientists have long known that vitamin D can strengthen teeth and bones by helping the body absorb calcium. Now researchers believe that high concentrations of this key micronutrient could also help prevent colorectal cancer—the third most common cancer in the U.S., killing more than 50,000 people a year. Dietary guidelines currently recommend that most adults get at least 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D a day for bone health, which can be done by eating fatty fish like salmon or trout and taking supplements or getting a judicious amount of sun exposure. But after analyzing data on more than 12,000 people in the U.S., Asia, and Europe, scientists at the American Cancer Society and other groups found that people with higher-than-recommended blood levels of vitamin D had a 22 percent lower risk of developing colorectal cancer. Those with lower-than-recommended levels, meanwhile, had a 30 percent higher risk for the disease. Study co-author Marji McCullough tells NPR.com that people over age 70 should increase their vitamin D uptake to 800 IUs daily, noting that “what’s optimal for bone health may not be optimal for colorectal risk reduction.”

Our Dense Bone – contains 2,000 IU of Vitamin D3, combined with Vitamin K2 and Strontium.

Vitamin K2 was added because it literally tells Vitamin D3 how to calcify or not calcify different internal areas of our bodies.  For instance, Vitamin K2 directs Vitamin D3 to calcify bone – very important as we grow older.  In the arteriole walls of our arteries, there is a Vitamin K2 dependent protein that receives Vitamin K2, thus preventing the calcification of the artery.  This allows the calcium to be utilized by the bone as it should be.

Strontium is an ingredient less known, but extremely important for enhancing the benefits of Vitamin D3.  Clinical studies have shown Strontium to both decrease bone pain and increase bone formation – stimulating growth of new bone.

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