General Well-being

Surface cleaners and other household disinfectants could be making children overweight by altering the bacteria in their gut. Researchers in Canada found that infants who lived in households where antimicrobial disinfectants were used every week were twice as likely—at ages 3 to 4 months—to have higher levels of lachnospiraceae gut bacteria, which are very efficient at breaking down food and help the human body extract more energy. By age 3, those children were more likely to be overweight or obese than kids whose households hadn’t used disinfectants as regularly. High levels of lachnospiraceae have been linked in animal studies to increased levels of body fat and insulin resistance. The study also found that children living in households that used eco-friendly cleaning products were less likely to be overweight, though that may have been because those kids had healthier lifestyles and diets overall. Senior researcher Anita Kozyrskyj says further research is needed, but urges people to “take it easy” when cleaning with disinfectants. “Our observations were at the high end [of cleanliness],” she tells USA Today, “with people who were cleaning more than weekly, up to daily.”

,

Add a Comment:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *