Omega-3 Deficiency Cause Nearly 100,000 Deaths a Year

The science behind omega-3 fatty acids is more compelling than ever. How critical is our need for enough omega-3 fatty acids? Extremely critical, according to a report in the Public Library of Science Medicine Journal. Harvard researchers looked at twelve dietary, lifestyle and metabolic risk factors such as tobacco smoking and high blood pressure and used a mathematical model to determine how many fatalities could have been prevented if people took control of their health.

Low Vitamin D Linked to Mobility Loss and Potential Disabilities

Despite what traditional medicine has preached for years, emerging science has removed all doubt that regular, unfiltered sunlight exposure, which helps promote and maintain optimal blood levels of vitamin D, plays a critical role in health promotion and disease prevention. And a recent study published in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Science further confirms this, having found that inadequate blood levels of vitamin D can lead to decreased mobility and even disablement, particularly among the elderly.

Stressed Out? Cheer Up – 17 Reasons It Is Great To Be Alive Today

The great comedian Jackie Gleason once quipped, “The past remembers a lot better than it lived.”  Honestly, there is much truth in this statement. It is easy to get overwhelmed with the frenetic pace of our non-stop world and even the nightly news is a source of fear and trepidation when we see the seemingly endless carnage and despair in so many corners of the world. But it is also helpful to be reminded that our world and society is in many ways much better than years past. If you are feeling overwhelmed, there are healthy, natural ways to deal with stress.

Key Nutrients to Combat the Modern Stress Epidemic

Be it work, finances, relationships, or health issues, most of us experience stressful events at some point in our lives. But today, researchers are witnessing levels of stress that are virtually unprecedented. A startling 80% of Americans now report experiencing intense, chronic stress over personal finances and the economy. And 30 million Americans take medication to treat depression, but for most people, antidepressants serve mostly as a placebo, scientists now say.

A Deeper Look Into Vitamin C

Vitamin C, it’s everywhere. Daily vitamins, cold remedies and orange juice are all full of this ingredient, and most people accept that it’s good for them. But how many people realize the full potential of vitamin C in multiple areas of their health and life? Who takes the time to research the wondrous effects that this vitamin really has? By Any Other Name Vitamin C is sometimes known by another name: ascorbic acid. Of course, no matter what you call it, vitamin C is still beneficial. It’s been the case for hundreds of years. Sailors, for instance, would fight of scurvy with a healthy dose of the stuff. Scientists now realize that ascorbic acid helps create collagen in the skin. This protein is necessary to give strength and blood vessels strength and firmness, while vitamin C helps skin create scar tissue. It might not be pretty, but it does help (Read More)

The Vital Importance of Glutathione

Like all antioxidants, glutathione works to prevent the damage free radicals, peroxides, and other reactive oxygen species do to human cells. But glutathione isn’t just another antioxidant–it could be called, without exaggeration, the single most important antioxidant for human health. The good news? Your body naturally produces glutathione. The bad news? There’s a long list of things which can reduce your natural production, resulting in a startlingly high percentage of deficiency across the population: pollution medications poor diet stress trauma aging infections radiation exposure to heavy metals So what’s the solution? That’s a lot of ways to fall behind in your production of this vital antioxidant. Good living can help maintain your glutathione levels to some degree; this mostly includes things you should already be doing, like eating right, avoiding excess radiation, watching your air quality, and keeping your stress to reasonable levels. Exercise also boosts glutathione production, as the chemical (Read More)