Espresso Emission

Coffee boosts the brain’s production of an enzyme that reduces the damage caused by harmful tau proteins associated with aging, according to researchers at Indiana University who discovered it. The enzyme, called NMNAT2, protects neurons against stress and also combats misfolded proteins called tau that are linked to diseases, such as Alzheimer’s

Alcohol Fights Dementia

Drinking moderate amounts of alcohol regularly improves a person’s chances of reaching age 85 free of dementia, according to a study led by the University of California San Diego School of Medicine. Researchers found that among men and women 85 and older, individuals who consumed “moderate to heavy” amounts of alcohol five to seven days a week were twice as likely to be cognitively healthy than non-drinkers.

How Exercise Slows Aging

If working out makes you feel younger, a new study suggests it’s no illusion- vigorous exercise can actually slow the aging process on a cellular level, turning back the clock nearly a decade. Researchers analyzed 6,000 adults based on their physical activity and biological markers of aging, Time.com reports. Most importantly, they used DNA samples to measure the length of participants’ telomeres, protein caps that protect chromosomes, like the plastic tips of shoelaces. Telomeres shrink with age – we lose bits of them every time a cell divides. “In general, people with shorter telomeres die sooner and are more likely to develop many of our chronic diseases,” says study author Larry Tucker. Taking into account risk factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and obesity, the researchers found people who exercised strenuously – say, running for 30 to 40 minutes five days per week – had longer telomeres. That gave them (Read More)

A Clue On ‘Super Agers’

Researchers are a step closer to understanding the secrets of “super agers,” the lucky seniors who retain their memory, mental sharpness, and thinking skills for much longer than their peers. A team at Northwestern University performed brain scans on 24 super agers – whom they classified as people over 80 who scored as highly in memory test as those 15 to 30 years younger-and 12 cognitively average counterparts. Over a period of 18 months, the researchers looked for changes in thickness in the participants’ cortex, the outer layer of the brain responsible for thinking, memory, and decision making. They found that while all the seniors lost brain volume, the super agers retained twice as much as their peers. More research is now needed to understand what causes this lower rate of atrophy, reports CBSNews.com. “The most important aspect is to determine the possible genetic, social, and environmental factors that contribute (Read More)

Midlife Weight Gain

Americans tend to gain a pound of two each year between early adulthood and middle age. That gradual weight gain may not seem to be a cause for concern, but Harvard scientists warn that the extra pounds add up and significantly increase the risk for chronic health issues and early death. The researchers analyzed the health records of about 118,000 people. Women gained an average of 22 pounds between the ages of 18 and 55, while men packed an average of 19 pounds. The study found that a gain of five pounds was the threshold for health problems. For every 11 pounds a person gained, the risk for type 2 diabetes rose by 30 percent, for high blood pressure by 14 percent, and for cancer by 6 percent. Study author Frank Hu tells MedicalDaily.com that “even a modest around of weight gain may have important health consequences.”

The Vital Importance of Glutathione

Like all antioxidants, glutathione works to prevent the damage free radicals, peroxides, and other reactive oxygen species do to human cells. But glutathione isn’t just another antioxidant–it could be called, without exaggeration, the single most important antioxidant for human health. The good news? Your body naturally produces glutathione. The bad news? There’s a long list of things which can reduce your natural production, resulting in a startlingly high percentage of deficiency across the population: pollution medications poor diet stress trauma aging infections radiation exposure to heavy metals Your body uses glutathione to protect your cells from free radical damage, to eliminate toxins, to support energy production, and to help enhance immune system functions. That’s the good news. Unfortunately, emerging science indicates that our Glutathione level in the body drops with age. Why the Decrease? There are several factors for the decrease in glutathione levels with age. Stress is a factor. As (Read More)

Alzheimer’s Prevention: Natural Ways To Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

Contrary to popular opinion, Alzheimer’s disease can be prevented. It all depends on a healthy lifestyle. The key is to reduce the risks associated with Alzheimer’s and dementia. According to Help Guide, six of the most important things you can do to keep your brain healthy include: Mental stimulation Regular exercise Maintain a healthy diet Get lots of quality sleep Maintain an active social life Manage your stress effectively Do Vitamin Supplements Help Prevent Alzheimer’s? One way to stimulate your brain’s functions while maintaining a healthy diet and reduce stress is to supplement your diet with vitamin supplements. It is important to realize, however, that you can’t simply take supplements as a substitute for a healthy diet. You should still focus on eating the right foods in the right amounts, and maintaining a regular exercise regimen. Nevertheless, if you eat right, get enough sleep and exercise, and keep your mind active, (Read More)