Spinach Vs. Kale

There’s a lot of hype around kale these days, and for great reason! Kale is low in calorie, contains zero fat, rich in calcium and iron, and packed with fiber and sulfur to promote detoxification. It’s a powerful source of antioxidants like carotenoids and flavonoids; both of which are believed to help protect against some cancers. Kale is also a great anti-inflammatory food, filled with 10% of the recommended daily intake (RDI) of omega-3 fatty acids, which help fight asthma, arthritis and autoimmune disorders. It is great for cardiovascular support, as it can help lower cholesterol levels. “Super Food” is an understatement for this leafy green powerhouse. With all attention on kale, we’ve left nutrient-dense spinach in the dark. Spinach is low in calorie, has zero fat, and contains more than a dozen individual flavonoid compounds, which work together as cancer-fighting antioxidants.  This dark leafy green will protect your brain (Read More)

6 Foods Destructive To Our Bones: Part 2

Vitamin A In the case of vitamin A, recent research is proving that you really can get too much of a good thing. Found in eggs, full-fat dairy, liver, and vitamin-fortified foods, vitamin A is important for vision and the immune system. But the American diet is naturally high in vitamin A, and most multivitamins also contain vitamin A. So it’s possible to get much more than the recommended allotment of 5,000 IUs (international units) a day—which many experts think is too high anyway. Postmenopausal women, in particular, seem to be susceptible to vitamin A overload. Studies show that women whose intake was higher than 5,000 IUs had more than double the fracture rate of women whose intake was less than 1,600 IUs a day. Switch to low-fat or nonfat dairy products only, and eat egg whites rather than whole eggs (all the vitamin A is in the yolk). Also (Read More)

6 Foods Destructive To Our Bones: Part 1

When we are born, we are blessed with approximately 305 bones. As we grow and develop, many of these bones fuse together to become our basic skeleton. By the time we become an adult we have approximately 206 bones. This remarkable skeleton is made up of bones stronger than reinforced concrete. As we age, our bones become less dense and more brittle. What most people don’t understand is the connection between the foods we eat that cause us to lose this strength little by little – about 1% per year. Like the proverbial lobster boiled alive in water that starts out tepid and slowly comes to a boil – our poor food choices over time eventually takes its toll on our bones. This weakening of our bone structure becomes more pronounced at 30-40 years of age and gradually gets worse if we don’t take action. What you eat plays a (Read More)

Osteoporosis and Vitamin D

We have become suddenly and painfully aware of osteoporosis or loss of bone density. Fifteen years ago, the only ones warning of this were the “alternative” practitioners and they were chided for yelling “fire” when it didn’t exist. But now we are hearing advertisements for dozens of products to strengthen your bones and doctors have yearly tests available for bone density determinations. Unfortunately the drugs cobbled up to treat osteoporosis have short-term benefits but long term detriment because they harden the outer shell of the bone but allow the inner bone to become spongy and friable. Thus any sharp stress often fractures the brittle outer part of the bone and healing is very slow.

Why Beer Could Be Good for Your Health

That beer belly of yours might not be associated with beer at all, according to a Czech Republic study cited recently by Harvard’s Harvey B. Simon, M.D. Though most of us can agree that drinking copious amounts of beer will more than likely result in negative health effects, scientific research suggests that consuming beer in moderation can actually improve your health. Take heart, beer lovers, and consider the following rewards of kicking back with your favorite brew. Lowers Risk of Cardiovascular Disease A lower risk of cardiovascular disease has been observed in men and women who drink beer. The higher HDL levels (known as “good cholesterol”) in alcohol can be linked to this, according to Harvard researchers, who observe a consistent 25-40% reduction in risk. Having high levels of good cholesterol can be a big health boost for your heart, especially if you are able to keep levels of “bad” (Read More)

Vitamin D: Why You’re Probably Not Getting Enough

Vitamin D is essential to your health. It has been proven to provide the body with the following health benefits:  Bone Health Diabetes prevention Heart health and prevention of early death due to heart attack Decreased risk of cancer Lower blood pressure Yet, you are probably not getting as much vitamin D as you should. You have been taught since childhood that all you have to do is let a little sunshine fall on your skin and your body will make its own supply. Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. Why sunlight alone won’t work Not enough sun. During the winter months, the sun is too low on the horizon in the sky too few hours. The sun is blocked. This is true especially in the winter when people wear more clothing. However, even in the summer, when people wear fewer clothes, sunscreen can block the UV rays necessary for (Read More)

Inflammation, Pain, & Chronic Disease Link

Inflammation is now recognized as an overwhelming burden to the healthcare status of our population and the underlying basis of a significant number of diseases. The elderly generally bear the burden of morbidity and mortality, which may be reflective of elevated markers of inflammation resulting from decades of lifestyle choices. Lower cancer rates are associated with diets high in fiber, fruits, vegetables, and tea. AD and PD may be prevented or treated with aggressive vitamin E, curcumin, acetylcarnitine, and catechin supplementation.

Good Vibrations

According to the Journal of Arthritis & Rheumatism, the health of your joint cartilage is improved with vibratory motion. Vibrations allow the hyaluronic acid to be directed evenly among chondrocytes and the extracellular matrix, thus improving delivery of nutrients to chondrocytes in deeper layers and improving transportation of waste products. The average 70 kg (154 lbs) person has roughly 15 grams of hyaluronan in the body, one-third of which is turned over (degraded and synthesized) every day.