Vitamin B-Complex [INFOGRAPHIC]

The vitamin B complex provides important components of a healthy diet. The B vitamins can generally be found in vegetable, animal, or whole-grain food sources, as explained below. If supplementation is required, Liposomal Vitamin B Complex from the Let’s Talk Health inventory of dietary supplements is a great source for B vitamins, in a most usable liquid form for quick absorption. Here’s a helpful infographic below to help you visualize the importance of the B complex.  Vitamin B1 Thiamine Thiamine is known to aid appetite regulation and boost energy. Deficiency can cause diseases of the nervous system and dementia. B1 is found in whole-grain cereal products, particularly oatmeal and brown rice, asparagus, cauliflower, oranges, eggs, pork, and liver.  Vitamin B2 Riboflavin Riboflavin assists in the body’s metabolism, converting calories to energy. It also aids in the production of red blood cells, and promotes healthy vision and skin. Good sources for (Read More)

6 Foods Destructive To Our Bones: Part 2

Vitamin A In the case of vitamin A, recent research is proving that you really can get too much of a good thing. Found in eggs, full-fat dairy, liver, and vitamin-fortified foods, vitamin A is important for vision and the immune system. But the American diet is naturally high in vitamin A, and most multivitamins also contain vitamin A. So it’s possible to get much more than the recommended allotment of 5,000 IUs (international units) a day—which many experts think is too high anyway. Postmenopausal women, in particular, seem to be susceptible to vitamin A overload. Studies show that women whose intake was higher than 5,000 IUs had more than double the fracture rate of women whose intake was less than 1,600 IUs a day. Switch to low-fat or nonfat dairy products only, and eat egg whites rather than whole eggs (all the vitamin A is in the yolk). Also (Read More)

6 Foods Destructive To Our Bones: Part 1

When we are born, we are blessed with approximately 305 bones. As we grow and develop, many of these bones fuse together to become our basic skeleton. By the time we become an adult we have approximately 206 bones. This remarkable skeleton is made up of bones stronger than reinforced concrete. As we age, our bones become less dense and more brittle. What most people don’t understand is the connection between the foods we eat that cause us to lose this strength little by little – about 1% per year. Like the proverbial lobster boiled alive in water that starts out tepid and slowly comes to a boil – our poor food choices over time eventually takes its toll on our bones. This weakening of our bone structure becomes more pronounced at 30-40 years of age and gradually gets worse if we don’t take action. What you eat plays a (Read More)

Put Down the Haagen-Dazs: Comfort Food is a Myth

What’s your favorite “comfort food”? You know you have one — a treat you use to soothe bruised feelings following some distressing event. Well, guess what: You’re kidding yourself. A new study finds comfort foods are no more effective at lifting moods than any other foods — or even sitting quietly without consuming a calorie. “Negative moods naturally dissipate over time,” writes a University of Minnesota research team led by psychologist Traci Mann. “Individuals may be giving comfort food ‘credit’ for mood effects that would have occurred even in the absence of the comfort food.” That tub of Haagen-Dazs may not have magical powers after all. Mann and her colleagues describe four experiments, three of which were similarly structured. At an introductory session, participants were specifically asked “What foods would make you feel better if you were in a bad mood?”, as well as other foods they enjoy but do (Read More)

Shedding Pounds With A High-Fat Diet?

Can you lose weight with a diet that places no restrictions on your fat intake? Those who swear by the Atkins plan and other low-carbohydrate regimes have long insisted you can – and new research backs them up, reports The New York Times. In a study funded by the National Institutes of Health, a racially diverse group of 148 obese men and women were given diets to follow. Half were put on low-fat regimes, which limited their total fat intake to less than 30 percent of their daily calories, while the other half followed low-carb diets that involved eating mostly protein and fat. Neither group was given calorie limits. Over the course of a year, those on the low-carb diet lost around 8 pounds more than the low-fat group, shed more body fat, and showed greater improvements in cholesterol levels and other measures of cardiovascular health. Those on the low-fat (Read More)

Naturally Cheap Protein Sources

People looking to lose weight know the dangers of a diet high in carbohydrates.  If you’re looking to transform your body, then protein is perhaps the most important macronutrient you could ever have on your side. It’s the macro with the highest thermic effect of feeding (i.e. you burn calories by eating it), it helps you regulate insulin by causing the release of insulin’s “balancing” hormone, glucagon, and it provides the vital building blocks to support maintenance of your calorie burning lean muscle as you lose those stubborn pounds.

Why Beer Could Be Good for Your Health

That beer belly of yours might not be associated with beer at all, according to a Czech Republic study cited recently by Harvard’s Harvey B. Simon, M.D. Though most of us can agree that drinking copious amounts of beer will more than likely result in negative health effects, scientific research suggests that consuming beer in moderation can actually improve your health. Take heart, beer lovers, and consider the following rewards of kicking back with your favorite brew. Lowers Risk of Cardiovascular Disease A lower risk of cardiovascular disease has been observed in men and women who drink beer. The higher HDL levels (known as “good cholesterol”) in alcohol can be linked to this, according to Harvard researchers, who observe a consistent 25-40% reduction in risk. Having high levels of good cholesterol can be a big health boost for your heart, especially if you are able to keep levels of “bad” (Read More)

Research says increased physical activity reduces effect of salt on blood pressure

Living a healthy lifestyle isn’t always easy. In addition to concerns about eating healthy and exercising to lose weight, we must also consider other health concerns like high blood pressure and cholesterol. High blood pressure is particularly dangerous because it can lead to a number of life-threatening problems such as hypertension, heart attacks, and strokes. Fortunately, many of the things that work for losing weight also work for lowering blood pressure. According to a study from the American Heart Association, physical activity has a significant impact on blood pressure. This impact is particularly pronounced in individuals who consume a high-salt diet. Salt is well known to be a leading cause of high blood pressure, so individuals looking to reduce the risk of high blood pressure due to their high-salt diet are encouraged to increase their level of physical activity. However, the best way to offset the negative effects of salt (Read More)

Cancer Fighting Foods

The war on cancer is still raging. Doctors and researchers have not given up in their efforts to find a cure. Meanwhile, there are some techniques individuals can use, which will help them fight their own battle against cancer. It may seem like an impossible task or perhaps a long shot, but what is there to lose? The most important part to staying healthy is to eat right. Nutrients in cancer fighting foods play a vital part in the reformation of healthy red cells. Without the proper amount of minerals, vitamins, iron and proteins, the human body would cease to exist. The war against cancer is not fought solely in the medicine cabinet, but rather in the kitchen. Knowing which foods to prepare, and what healing properties they contain can improve your quality of life. What Foods Have the Cancer Fighting Nutrients I Need?   Vitamin C is loaded with (Read More)

Halloween: The Real Spooky Truth [INFOGRAPHIC]

Halloween is here, which means children will be frolicking the streets in pursuit sugary goodness. As October comes to a close, we enter American Diabetes Month, this November. We found it intriguing that americans binge on sugar right before we enter a month dedicated to diabetes awareness. Why not bring awareness before the damage is done? We want to bring light to some of the jaw dropping numbers associated with sugar consumption and diabetes in america with this infographic below.