Healthy Heart, Sharp Mind

Americans are constantly advised to lead “heart healthy” lives, and for good reason: Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the U.S. But cardiovascular health is also a boon to the brain, new research reveals. The study examined the habits and lifestyles of more than 1,000 people who were an average age of 72. Specifically, they assessed how many of the American Heart Association’s goals the participants achieved—keeping physically active; main tain ing a healthy weight and eating regimen; not smoking; and keeping blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels under control. The participants also completed cognitive tests when the study began and again six years later. As it turned out, people who more closely adhered to a heart-healthy lifestyle showed fewer signs of age-related mental decline, reports TechTimes.com. University of Miami neurologist Hannah Gardener, who led the study, suggests more research is needed to pinpoint the age ranges (Read More)

Fish Oils Reduce Cardiac Deaths

Omega-3 fatty acids found in cold water fish and fish oil supplements reduce the risk of cardiac death up to 30 percent, says a review of 14 randomized, controlled trials published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology. Omega-3s reduced the risk of cardiac death by 17 percent in people who had elevated triglycerides or LDL cholesterol. But patients who took more than 1 gram every day of EPA and DHA – the main fatty acids found in fish oil – reduced their risk by almost 30 percent.

Senseless Stents Can Be Deadly

One of the most common treatments for severe chest pain is stenting—the insertion of a minuscule wire cage that opens up blocked arteries. But a major new study has come to a shocking conclusion: In many cases, stents are no better than a placebo. Researchers at Imperial College London recruited 200 people with a significantly blocked coronary artery and chest pain so bad that it limited their physical activity, reports The New York Times. All the participants took a six-week course of drugs to lower the risk of a heart attack and relieve chest pain. They then had an operation to have a stent inserted—but only some actually had the device fitted. When the researchers examined the patients six weeks later, both groups said they had less chest pain and showed similar levels of improvement on treadmill tests. Cardiologists said one reason stents might not be effective—except as placebos—is because blockages (Read More)

Heat for your Heart

Frequent use of sauna can help keep you from developing high blood pressure, one of the most important risk factors for heart disease, says a study from the University of Eastern Finland. A long-term study found that the risk was reduced by 46 percent in men who had a sauna at least four times a week when compared to those who only had one sauna a week.

The Chelation Miracle – EDTA & Cardio Advantage Plus

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular disease, particularly heart attacks and strokes, are the number one disease killer in the United States. Cardiovascular disease accounts for nearly 801,000 deaths in the US. That’s about 1 of every 3 deaths in the US. About 2,200 Americans die of cardiovascular disease each day, an average of 1 death every 40 seconds. Cardiovascular diseases claim more lives each year than all forms of cancer and Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease combined. About 92.1 million American adults are living with some form of cardiovascular disease or the after-effects of stroke. But guess what? There is good news! There are ways to reverse heart disease and the potential of a life-ending heart attack – naturally – with our best selling Cardio Advantage Plus. Cardio Advantage Plus was designed to assist the body in overcoming the symptoms of heart disease and high blood pressure by (Read More)

NSAIDs Boost Heart Risk

Evidence is mounting that common pain killers such as ibuprofen and naproxen may be tied to greater risk for heart problems, reports The Independent (U.K.). Doctors have long been concerned that non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may play a role in heart failure, because they reduce the body’s ability to metabolize salt. To investigate that link, researchers in Italy examined the health records of 7.6 million people who had recently been treated with NSAIDs, and compared them with data on 8.2 million people who didn’t use the drugs. They found that with the exception of celecoxib (Celebrex), NSAIDs raised the relative risk of heart failure by 19 percent. The higher the dosage of these drugs, the greater the risk. The researchers said the fact that these drugs could be bought over the counter fueled the misconception that they were harmless in high doses. Peter Weissberg, from the British Heart Foundation, (Read More)

Hypochondria and Heart Disease

Worrying about getting sick may actually make you sick. That’s the conclusion of a new study from Norway that suggests hypochondriacs are at greater risk for heart disease, reports The Guardian (U.K.). Researchers asked 7,052 adults to complete questionnaires about their health concerns and then undergo physical exams. About 10 percent of volunteers had “health anxiety” they essentially worried about ailments they didn’t have. When the researchers tracked the volunteers’ heart health for 12 years, they found that those with health anxiety were 71 percent likelier to develop cardiac problems. The more severe their anxiety, the higher their risk. These findings don’t prove that hypochondria causes’ heart disease, but the study’s authors nevertheless believe that taking steps to ease unnecessary anxiety could have health benefits. “Instead of worrying about what’s going on with your body and running to the doctor for any physical health problem,” says lead author Line Iden (Read More)

Introducing New & Improved Cardio Advantage Plus – Now With Lycopene

A recent Harvard study of more than 28,000 women showed those with the highest blood Lycopene levels were half as likely to develop heart disease. As emerging research and science bring forth compelling evidence regarding advances in nutrition, we seek to incorporate them into our formulas

Part 2: 5 Surprising Signs of an Unhealthy Heart

Continued from Part 1: 5 Surprising Signs of an Unhealthy Heart Dizziness, Faintness, or Shortness of Breath More than 40 percent of women in one study published in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, reported having experienced shortness of breath in the days before a heart attack. You might feel like you can’t breathe, or you might feel dizzy or faint, as you would at high altitude. If you can’t catch your breath while walking upstairs, vacuuming, weeding the garden, or doing other activities that previously caused you no trouble, this is a reason to be on the alert. Why it happens: Not enough blood is getting through the arteries to carry sufficient oxygen to the heart. The heart muscle pain of angina may also make it hurt to draw a deep breath. Coronary artery disease (CAD), in which plaque builds up and blocks the arteries that feed the (Read More)

Part 1: 5 Surprising Signs of an Unhealthy Heart

We’ve all read the signs of a heart attack listed on posters in the hospital waiting room. But what if there were other, earlier signs that could alert you ahead of time that your heart was in trouble? It turns out there are. Researchers have done a lot of work in recent years looking at the signs and symptoms patients experienced in the months or even years leading up to a heart attack. “The heart, together with the arteries that feed it, is one big muscle, and when it starts to fail the symptoms can show up in many parts of the body,” says cardiologist Jonathan Goldstein of St. Michael’s Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.   Cardio Advantage Plus – Heart Health Formula   Here are two of the five surprising clues that your heart needs checking out. Any of these signs – and particularly two or more together (Read More)