Got Absorption? Understanding Liposomal Delivery of Nutrients

Download this FREE presentation by our CEO, Jim Cartmill entitled:  Got Absorption?  Maximizing Nutrition Through Liposomal Delivery You may not know that only a small percentage of traditional nutritional supplements are absorbed into our bloodstream.  Learn how liposomal delivery of key nutrients is a game-changer for this seeking to dramatically increase absorption levels of 5 key nutrients.  Click on the link below for your free download: Got Absorption?  

Key Nutrients to Combat the Modern Stress Epidemic

Be it work, finances, relationships, or health issues, most of us experience stressful events at some point in our lives. But today, researchers are witnessing levels of stress that are virtually unprecedented. A startling 80% of Americans now report experiencing intense, chronic stress over personal finances and the economy. And 30 million Americans take medication to treat depression, but for most people, antidepressants serve mostly as a placebo, scientists now say.

NSAIDs Boost Heart Risk

Evidence is mounting that common pain killers such as ibuprofen and naproxen may be tied to greater risk for heart problems, reports The Independent (U.K.). Doctors have long been concerned that non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may play a role in heart failure, because they reduce the body’s ability to metabolize salt. To investigate that link, researchers in Italy examined the health records of 7.6 million people who had recently been treated with NSAIDs, and compared them with data on 8.2 million people who didn’t use the drugs. They found that with the exception of celecoxib (Celebrex), NSAIDs raised the relative risk of heart failure by 19 percent. The higher the dosage of these drugs, the greater the risk. The researchers said the fact that these drugs could be bought over the counter fueled the misconception that they were harmless in high doses. Peter Weissberg, from the British Heart Foundation, (Read More)

Hypochondria and Heart Disease

Worrying about getting sick may actually make you sick. That’s the conclusion of a new study from Norway that suggests hypochondriacs are at greater risk for heart disease, reports The Guardian (U.K.). Researchers asked 7,052 adults to complete questionnaires about their health concerns and then undergo physical exams. About 10 percent of volunteers had “health anxiety” they essentially worried about ailments they didn’t have. When the researchers tracked the volunteers’ heart health for 12 years, they found that those with health anxiety were 71 percent likelier to develop cardiac problems. The more severe their anxiety, the higher their risk. These findings don’t prove that hypochondria causes’ heart disease, but the study’s authors nevertheless believe that taking steps to ease unnecessary anxiety could have health benefits. “Instead of worrying about what’s going on with your body and running to the doctor for any physical health problem,” says lead author Line Iden (Read More)

NSAID’s Link to Heart Attacks

Many people don’t think twice before taking painkillers to ease everyday aches and pains. But new research adds to mounting evidence that commonly used non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – such as Advil, Motrin, and Aleve- could substantially increase the risk of heart attack. Canadian and Europe researchers’ pooled data  from several studies on 446,000 people ages 40 to 79. They found that taking NSAIDs for just one week increased the risk of heart attack by up to 53 percent. The risk depends on the drug, and climbs over time and at higher doses. The study doesn’t prove NSAIDs cause heart attacks, and the absolute risk of suffering a cardiac episode after taking the drugs remains small. But lead author Michele Bally says the finding should encourage patients to discuss their needs with a doctor. “People are often not aware of their own baseline cardiovascular risk,” she tells The New (Read More)

Introducing New & Improved Cardio Advantage Plus – Now With Lycopene

A recent Harvard study of more than 28,000 women showed those with the highest blood Lycopene levels were half as likely to develop heart disease. As emerging research and science bring forth compelling evidence regarding advances in nutrition, we seek to incorporate them into our formulas

Spinach Vs. Kale

There’s a lot of hype around kale these days, and for great reason! Kale is low in calorie, contains zero fat, rich in calcium and iron, and packed with fiber and sulfur to promote detoxification. It’s a powerful source of antioxidants like carotenoids and flavonoids; both of which are believed to help protect against some cancers. Kale is also a great anti-inflammatory food, filled with 10% of the recommended daily intake (RDI) of omega-3 fatty acids, which help fight asthma, arthritis and autoimmune disorders. It is great for cardiovascular support, as it can help lower cholesterol levels. “Super Food” is an understatement for this leafy green powerhouse. With all attention on kale, we’ve left nutrient-dense spinach in the dark. Spinach is low in calorie, has zero fat, and contains more than a dozen individual flavonoid compounds, which work together as cancer-fighting antioxidants.  This dark leafy green will protect your brain (Read More)

Is good health contagious? A new study says yes.

There’s no magic solution for weight loss and improved health. But data collected by researchers in Kentucky shows friends and family members may lose weight more effectively by working as a team. That finding comes from a new study reported by the American Heart Association. The study’s results indicate that strong social networks, such as those among friends and relatives, help people lose weight and improve their overall health. Are healthy habits contagious? The study, undertaken by researchers in Kentucky, answers that question in the affirmative. The data showed that dieters who lost weight collectively with friends and family lost more weight and were likelier to achieve permanent results. Study organizers, working with a pool of 552 participants, assigned friends and family members into social groups of between two and eight people. The groups worked together to improve their health. Over the course of ten months, participants within social groups lost an (Read More)