The Cost of Losing Sleep – Your Immunity

Sleep often takes a backseat to parenting or a career that requires long hours, but new research suggests that sacrificing slumber for productivity is a bad trade-off. Surveys of 22,000 Americans show that people who slept five hours or less on average weeknight were 28 percent more likely to have had a cold in the past month than those who averaged at least seven hours. Worse still, Reuters.com reports, the sleep-challenged subjects were 82 percent more likely to report battling the flu, pneumonia, or an ear infection. The study doesn’t prove that sleep loss increases susceptibility to infections, but researchers note that sleep deprivation does hinder infection-fighting white blood cells. Moreover, people who are chronically tired may also be less likely to exercise or follow a healthy diet. Says study author Aric Prather, “It is our hope that this work will help raise the profile of sleep as a critical (Read More)

Poor Sleep Tied to Alzheimer’s

Adults with normal thinking and memory skills who have trouble sleeping may be at greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease, a new study shows. Researchers asked 101 older people with genetic risk factors for the degenerative brain disease to complete a sleep questionnaire. Samples of participants’ spinal fluid revealed those reporting poor sleep quality had more biological markers of Alzheimer’s, including buildups and tangles of toxic proteins, such as beta-amyloid and tau, as well as brain-cell damage and inflammation, the New York Times reports. “Not everyone with sleep problems is destined to develop Alzheimer’s disease,” says study author Barbara Bendlin of the University of Wisconsin. “We’re looking at groups of people, and over the whole group we find the association of poor sleep with the markers of Alzheimer’s.” The precise link is unclear. Previous studies suggest the brain “cleans house” overnight, clearing out harmful toxins, and sleep loss could disrupt this (Read More)

The Power Of Sleep – Better Than Winning The Lottery

Improving the quality of your sleep can make you feel as good as winning the lottery, a new study suggests. British researchers analyzed the slumber patterns of more than 30,500 people over the course of four years and found those who made positive changes in their sleep habits were significantly happier and healthier. In fact, researchers said, the mental and physical advantages of better sleep were similar to improvements observed in British lottery winners two years after they’ve hit a $250,000 jackpot, reports ScienceDaily.com. It’s estimated that more than one-third of adults in the U.S. don’t get enough sleep, which puts them at higher risk of developing diabetes, obesity, depression, and other chronic health issues. Are you one of the many people that occasionally has problems sleeping? You should know that Melatonin is important for your body’s sleep cycle and supports restful sleep patterns. Melatonin is a natural hormone made by your (Read More)