Exercise Stops Brain Shrinkage

After people turn 40, their brain shrinks by about 5 percent every 10 years. But new research suggests aerobic exercise could have a protective effect, slowing this age-related deterioration and keeping the mind sharp over time. To investigate the effects of exercise on the hippocampus, a brain region essential for creating and storing memories, an international team of researchers analyzed 14 previous studies, involving 737 people between ages 24 and 76. Some of the participants were healthy; others suffered from Alzheimer’s disease, depression, or schizophrenia. The researchers split the subjects into two groups—people who engaged in various fitness regimens for up to two years and those who didn’t exercise—and compared scans of their brains. They found that aerobic activity appeared to dramatically increase the size of the left region of the hippocampus. “When you exercise, you produce a chemical called brain-derived neurotrophic factor,” lead author Joseph Firth from Western Sydney (Read More)

Alcohol Fights Dementia

Drinking moderate amounts of alcohol regularly improves a person’s chances of reaching age 85 free of dementia, according to a study led by the University of California San Diego School of Medicine. Researchers found that among men and women 85 and older, individuals who consumed “moderate to heavy” amounts of alcohol five to seven days a week were twice as likely to be cognitively healthy than non-drinkers.

Got Absorption? Understanding Liposomal Delivery of Nutrients

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New Year Resolution Hacks

Essential Tips For New Years Resolutions It is that time of year. For some, setting New Year resolutions might make you feel excited, for others, it may be a cause of undo stress or indifference. In recognition of this, it is good to have at least a loose road map for the things you would like to accomplish in the new year. It certainly should not be a standard to measure yourself by, but as an exercise in faith, intention and… more often than not, good old fashioned hard work. Here are some tips and things to remember as you set your resolutions for 2018: 1. Keep your list short and the tasks manageable. Remember we tend to “measure what we treasure”. If we say we want to exercise more and set a goal to run a marathon in 6 months, we tend to get overwhelmed and give up quickly. (Read More)

Resveratrol Could Be A Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) Alternative

Treatment based on resveratrol could be a safer alternative to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women and could help prevent breast cancer, according to a new study. The findings of a study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry indicate that resveratrol is the most likely candidate of the phytoestrogens to offer safer HRT and chemoprevention of breast cancer due to its estrogenic activity and high antitumor activity. “Because it (resveratrol) stimulated the transcription of endogenous estrogen receptor (ER) and proapoptotic effects, this phytoestrogen is the most promising candidate as an HRT alternative and chemo preventive reagent for breast cancer,” they concluded. However, study after study validates one of the big issues with resveratrol is the poor absorption obtained when taking orally. Many have tried our Liposomal Resveratrol that increases the absorption of this important nutrient dramatically.  Made with Non-GMO Resveratrol and Non-GMO Sunflower Seed Lecithin, it is a (Read More)

Standing Fights Obesity

It’s well established that a sedentary existence is bad for us and that regular exercise promotes better health. Apparently, new research reveals, we don’t even have to hit the treadmill to feel better; just standing up can have significant benefits, The Washington Post reports. A five-year study of more than 7,000 adults found that people who stood for a least 25 percent of their day displayed considerably lower risk of obesity – 32 percent for men and 35 percent among women. Meanwhile, standing for half of the day reduced the likelihood of obesity among men by 59 percent, compared with 47 percent among women. It’s unclear from the data if standing directly reduces obesity risk or if people who are obese simply stand less. But the results offer another argument for logging some upright time. “Many of us have sedentary jobs and commute long hours,” says lead author Kerem Shuval (Read More)

The Science of Humor

Comedians are funnier than the rest of us because they switch to a different part of their brains when they’re coming up with jokes, reports MedicalDaily.com. A team at the University of Southern California asked a group of professional and amateur comedians to come up with two captions – one funny, the other ordinary – for a New Yorker cartoon. They performed brain scans on the comedians as they performed this written task, and later had an outside panel rate each caption for humor. The researchers found that the experienced comedians had increased activity in their temporal lobe, a part of the brain involved with language, processing abstract information, and connecting feelings to events or objects. Those who weren’t as funny had more activity in their medial prefrontal cortex, the brain region responsible for complex planning and decision-making. “The more experience you have doing comedy,” explains study leader Ori Amir, (Read More)

Painkiller Dulls Empathy

Acetaminophen helps dull the pain of some 52 million Americans each week, but new research suggests it could also blunt their sensitivity to other people’s distress. Researchers conducted a series of experiments involving 200 college students to assess the effects of acetaminophen – an active ingredient in Tylenol and more than 600 other medications – on their ability to empathize. Participants read eight short stories with wrenching scenarios – one told of a person who suffered a knife wound that  cut to the bone; in another, someone grappled with the death of his father. As it turned out, CNN.com reports, the students who took 1,000 mg of acetaminophen (equivalent to two extra-strength Tylenol tablets) displayed less empathy for people who were enduring an emotionally or physically painful experience. “If you are having an argument with your spouse and you just took acetaminophen, this research suggests you might be less understanding (Read More)

Exercise Lowers Cancer Risk

If a healthy heart and trim waistline aren’t enough incentive, maybe a lower risk for cancer will inspire sedentary people to get moving. A new study from the National Cancer Institute shows that exercise may significantly lower the risk for 13 different forms of the disease, Time.com reports. Researchers analyzed 11 years of data on the health, diet, and activity of 1.4 million people and found that a higher level of physical exertion was associated with a 7 percent lower overall chance of developing cancer. Just a few hours of weekly exercise had a particular effect on esophageal cancer, lowering the risk for the disease by 42 percent. Working out also cut the risk for lung, kidney, stomach, and endometrial cancers by more than 20 percent and significantly reduced the likelihood that people would suffer from leukemia, colon cancer, or breast cancer. The more active people were, the more their (Read More)

The Power of Pomegranates

Pomegranates have been hailed as a “super food” that could help protect against inflammation and cancer.  New research shows this Middle Eastern fruit also contains powerful substances called ellagitannins that may slow the aging process, reports ScienceDaily.com. Throughout our lives, cells recycle worn-out mitochondria- the tiny powerhouse that provided them with energy. This process, known as mitophagy, slows down and malfunctions over time, resulting in weaker muscles and age-related frailty. In a study on worms and mice, scientists found that when consumed and broken down by gut bacteria, ellagitannins produce a compound called urolithin A that helps restore this mitochondrial clean-up process in cells where it has become inactive, significantly improving muscle strength and endurance. The worms’ life span also increased, by 45 percent. “It’s a completely natural substance, and its effect is powerful and measurable,” says the study’s co-author, Patrick Aebischer. Researchers caution that it’s not been determined that (Read More)