6 Foods Destructive To Our Bones: Part 2

Vitamin A In the case of vitamin A, recent research is proving that you really can get too much of a good thing. Found in eggs, full-fat dairy, liver, and vitamin-fortified foods, vitamin A is important for vision and the immune system. But the American diet is naturally high in vitamin A, and most multivitamins also contain vitamin A. So it’s possible to get much more than the recommended allotment of 5,000 IUs (international units) a day—which many experts think is too high anyway. Postmenopausal women, in particular, seem to be susceptible to vitamin A overload. Studies show that women whose intake was higher than 5,000 IUs had more than double the fracture rate of women whose intake was less than 1,600 IUs a day. Switch to low-fat or nonfat dairy products only, and eat egg whites rather than whole eggs (all the vitamin A is in the yolk). Also (Read More)

Osteoporosis and Vitamin D

We have become suddenly and painfully aware of osteoporosis or loss of bone density. Fifteen years ago, the only ones warning of this were the “alternative” practitioners and they were chided for yelling “fire” when it didn’t exist. But now we are hearing advertisements for dozens of products to strengthen your bones and doctors have yearly tests available for bone density determinations. Unfortunately the drugs cobbled up to treat osteoporosis have short-term benefits but long term detriment because they harden the outer shell of the bone but allow the inner bone to become spongy and friable. Thus any sharp stress often fractures the brittle outer part of the bone and healing is very slow.

Vitamin D: Why You’re Probably Not Getting Enough

Vitamin D is essential to your health. It has been proven to provide the body with the following health benefits:  Bone Health Diabetes prevention Heart health and prevention of early death due to heart attack Decreased risk of cancer Lower blood pressure Yet, you are probably not getting as much vitamin D as you should. You have been taught since childhood that all you have to do is let a little sunshine fall on your skin and your body will make its own supply. Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. Why sunlight alone won’t work Not enough sun. During the winter months, the sun is too low on the horizon in the sky too few hours. The sun is blocked. This is true especially in the winter when people wear more clothing. However, even in the summer, when people wear fewer clothes, sunscreen can block the UV rays necessary for (Read More)

Why Vitamin D Day?

Most know that vitamin D does not come from your diet, but rather from your skin when you expose it to the sun. What most people don’t know is that in the wintertime it’s hard to make vitamin D. As November approaches, the sun shifts its focus on the southern hemisphere and is no longer shining overhead in the North. What does this mean? It means that your skin is no longer able to produce much vitamin D. This November 2nd, learn more about vitamin D, deficiency and taking care of yourself in the winter.