6 Foods Destructive To Our Bones: Part 2

Vitamin A In the case of vitamin A, recent research is proving that you really can get too much of a good thing. Found in eggs, full-fat dairy, liver, and vitamin-fortified foods, vitamin A is important for vision and the immune system. But the American diet is naturally high in vitamin A, and most multivitamins also contain vitamin A. So it’s possible to get much more than the recommended allotment of 5,000 IUs (international units) a day—which many experts think is too high anyway. Postmenopausal women, in particular, seem to be susceptible to vitamin A overload. Studies show that women whose intake was higher than 5,000 IUs had more than double the fracture rate of women whose intake was less than 1,600 IUs a day. Switch to low-fat or nonfat dairy products only, and eat egg whites rather than whole eggs (all the vitamin A is in the yolk). Also (Read More)

Cancer Fighting Foods

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The war on cancer is still raging. Doctors and researchers have not given up in their efforts to find a cure. Meanwhile, there are some techniques individuals can use, which will help them fight their own battle against cancer. It may seem like an impossible task or perhaps a long shot, but what is there to lose? The most important part to staying healthy is to eat right. Nutrients in cancer fighting foods play a vital part in the reformation of healthy red cells. Without the proper amount of minerals, vitamins, iron and proteins, the human body would cease to exist. The war against cancer is not fought solely in the medicine cabinet, but rather in the kitchen. Knowing which foods to prepare, and what healing properties they contain can improve your quality of life. What Foods Have the Cancer Fighting Nutrients I Need?   Vitamin C is loaded with (Read More)

Going Green: Adding Leafy Greens to Virtually Any Diet

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Dark leafy greens are great sources of many vital nutrients, including iron, calcium and fiber. These antioxidant jackpots are also ideal sources of calcium and vitamins A, C and K. It is important to add a variety of these greens to your diet, so finding new and creative ways to fit them in can prevent green veggie boredom. Create a flavor-packed side dish by sautéing mustard greens, kale and others with light olive oil, diced shallots and fresh garlic. Or, try kale chips to satisfy that crispy, crunchy craving in place of chips or other less healthy snack options. These options make the greens the spotlight of the dish. If you want something a bit more incognito, there are many other ways to fit them into your diet without radical changes. Smoothies have risen in popularity over the last few years, and these thick treats are a perfect vessel for (Read More)