Lack Of Sleep Linked To Cancer & Alzheimer’s Disease

Persistent daytime drowsiness may be a warning sign for Alzheimer’s disease, a new study suggests. During sleep, the brain clears away clumps of a sticky protein linked to dementia, called amyloid. It’s well known that people with Alzheimer’s often have trouble sleeping. To examine the link between amyloid deposits and sleep, Mayo Clinic researchers surveyed 283 older people without dementia about their sleep habits and monitored their brains for amyloid buildup over a period of seven years. They found those who reported trouble sleeping, with frequent daytime sleepiness, were more likely to show rapid amyloid plaque accumulation than those who didn’t. Study author Prashanthi Vemuri tells Time​.com that the results highlight the importance of proper sleep. “It can prevent amyloid, which is one of the primary proteins underlying Alzheimer’s disease,” he says. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than one-third of U.S. adults suffer from lack of sleep, routinely getting (Read More)

Low on sleep? Stop computing before bed

Laptops and smartphones may keep you informed and connected like never before, but they also could be keeping you from getting enough sleep. A poll by the nonprofit National Sleep Foundation found a suspicious correlation between our use of high-tech gadgets and our worsening sleep habits. Here, a brief guide to the findings: What is the connection between sleep and smartphones? Forty-three percent of poll respondents said they rarely or never get a good night’s sleep. And nearly 95 percent reported that they frequently use a computer, smartphone, TV, or other electronic device in the hour before bedtime. “Technology has invaded the bedroom,” says study task force member Charles Czeisler, as quoted by Reuters, and that’s one reason so many Americans “routinely get less sleep than they need.” Do laptops cause other sleep-related problems? Yes. According to the researchers’ statement announcing their findings, “artificial-light exposure between dusk and the time (Read More)

Cyanocobalamin vs Methylcobalamin –
Improved Liposomal B-Complex with Methylcobalamin B12

Cyanocobalamin is the most commonly supplemented form of vitamin B12, but you might be surprised to discover that this form of vitamin B12 does not actually occur in plants or animal tissues. In other words, outside of the chemically synthesized cyanocobalamin that you encounter as B12 in most vitamin supplements, you would be extremely hard pressed to find this compound in nature (in fact you would not be able to find it). As the name implies, cyanocobalamin contains a cyanide molecule. Most people are familiar with cyanide as a poisonous substance. Although the amount of cyanide in a normal B12 supplement is small and from a toxicology point, viewed as insignificant, your body will still need to remove and eliminate this compound. This removal is accomplished through your detoxification systems with substances like glutathione being very important for the elimination of the cyanide. Compared with cyanocobalamin, it appears that methylcobalamin (Read More)