Essential Nutrients for a Happy and Healthy Pregnancy

Pregnancy can be overwhelming and full of stress, but it is vital that you get the essential nutrients to ensure that your baby is healthy and that you stay happy. While there is no magic potion that will give you everything you need, a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and whole grains will keep you and your baby healthy and happy. Folate and folic acid, which are B vitamins, are important for the development of a baby’s brain and spinal cord. Diets rich in folate and folic acid decrease the chances of low birth weight and premature deliveries. Mayo Clinic suggests that you get 800 micrograms of folate or folic acid each day. You can get these nutrients from peanuts, beans, orange, spinach and fortified cereals. Calcium is another essential nutrient that you and your baby need. specifically for strong teeth and a strong skeletal system. An average (Read More)

Osteoporosis and Vitamin D

We have become suddenly and painfully aware of osteoporosis or loss of bone density. Fifteen years ago, the only ones warning of this were the “alternative” practitioners and they were chided for yelling “fire” when it didn’t exist. But now we are hearing advertisements for dozens of products to strengthen your bones and doctors have yearly tests available for bone density determinations. Unfortunately the drugs cobbled up to treat osteoporosis have short-term benefits but long term detriment because they harden the outer shell of the bone but allow the inner bone to become spongy and friable. Thus any sharp stress often fractures the brittle outer part of the bone and healing is very slow.

Is the Flu Just a Simple Deficiency of Vitamin D?

There has been an age old question that scientists could not answer: Why is the flu most prevalent in winter? Fever, sore throat, cough, body pains and nausea all signal the onset of this debilitating condition. A fascinating new theory seeks to explain why flu takes hold during the winter months and why it infects mostly the elderly and those who are more sedentary. Dr. John Cannell is the chief author of a landmark theory that postulates that influenza epidemics are intimately linked to declining vitamin D levels. In California, Dr. Cannell works with patients at a maximum-security hospitals for the criminally insane. In recent years, he had become aware that vitamin D is a unique compound with profound effects on human immunity. He lists bone health, cancer prevention and blood pressure lowering effects as an indication that “vitamin D is really quite different from other vitamins.” Dr. Cannell postulated (Read More)

Low Vitamin D Levels Increases Multiple Sclerosis Progression

New research suggests vitamin D may protect against disease activity and progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Because vitamin D deficiency is common in individuals with MS, researchers set out to determine whether serum concentrations of 25-hyrdroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), a measure of vitamin D status, would be predictive of MS progression in patients during the early stages of the disease. In a study involving 465 patients with symptoms suggestive of MS (clinically isolated syndrome), serum 25(OH)D levels were measured at the beginning of the study and again at 6, 12 and 24 months. MS progression was tracked over a five-year follow-up period, clinically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Outcomes assessed included MS relapses and disability and MRI measurements of brain volume, new active lesions and increases in lesion volume. Overall, higher 25(OH)D status was associated with reduced MS activity and a slower rate of progression. Higher 25(OH)D levels (Read More)

Vitamin D: Why You’re Probably Not Getting Enough

Vitamin D is essential to your health. It has been proven to provide the body with the following health benefits:  Bone Health Diabetes prevention Heart health and prevention of early death due to heart attack Decreased risk of cancer Lower blood pressure Yet, you are probably not getting as much vitamin D as you should. You have been taught since childhood that all you have to do is let a little sunshine fall on your skin and your body will make its own supply. Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. Why sunlight alone won’t work Not enough sun. During the winter months, the sun is too low on the horizon in the sky too few hours. The sun is blocked. This is true especially in the winter when people wear more clothing. However, even in the summer, when people wear fewer clothes, sunscreen can block the UV rays necessary for (Read More)

Why Vitamin D Day?

Most know that vitamin D does not come from your diet, but rather from your skin when you expose it to the sun. What most people don’t know is that in the wintertime it’s hard to make vitamin D. As November approaches, the sun shifts its focus on the southern hemisphere and is no longer shining overhead in the North. What does this mean? It means that your skin is no longer able to produce much vitamin D. This November 2nd, learn more about vitamin D, deficiency and taking care of yourself in the winter.