Inflammation Triggers Chronic Disease

The presence of inflammation is what opens the door to most chronic disease.  It can and often does occur for years before it exists at levels sufficient to be apparent or clinically significant. More than half of Americans suffer from chronic or recurrent pain, and nearly half (46 percent) of poll takers reported pain in the last two weeks.  Is it any wonder that chronic disease is such a big issue?  Inflammation is now recognized as an overwhelming burden to the healthcare status of our population and the underlying basis of a significant number of diseases. How long it has been smoldering really determines the degree of severity of a disease and often the prognosis assuming the inflammation can be controlled. One could also argue that without inflammation most disease would not even exist. Take a look at this list of diseases and their relationship with inflammation: Disease Mechanism Allergy 4 (Read More)

5 Surprising Signs of an Unhealthy Heart

We’ve all read the signs of a heart attack listed on posters in the hospital waiting room. But what if there were other, earlier signs that could alert you ahead of time that your heart was in trouble? It turns out there are. Researchers have done a lot of work in recent years looking at the signs and symptoms patients experienced in the months or even years leading up to a heart attack. “The heart, together with the arteries that feed it, is one big muscle, and when it starts to fail the symptoms can show up in many parts of the body,” says cardiologist Jonathan Goldstein of St. Michael’s Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

NSAID’s Link to Heart Attacks

Many people don’t think twice before taking painkillers to ease everyday aches and pains. But new research adds to mounting evidence that commonly used non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – such as Advil, Motrin, and Aleve- could substantially increase the risk of heart attack. Canadian and Europe researchers’ pooled data  from several studies on 446,000 people ages 40 to 79. They found that taking NSAIDs for just one week increased the risk of heart attack by up to 53 percent. The risk depends on the drug, and climbs over time and at higher doses. The study doesn’t prove NSAIDs cause heart attacks, and the absolute risk of suffering a cardiac episode after taking the drugs remains small. But lead author Michele Bally says the finding should encourage patients to discuss their needs with a doctor. “People are often not aware of their own baseline cardiovascular risk,” she tells The New (Read More)

The Physical Benefits of a Good Belly Laugh

When we laugh heartily among friends, we exhale repeatedly without drawing breath. This physical effort leaves us exhausted and triggers the release of protective endorphins, one of the complex neuropeptide chemicals of the brain that regulate pain and promote feelings of well-being. Watching 15 minutes of comedy in the company of others can increase your pain threshold by an average of 10%. Laughter is 30 times more likely to happen when we are with others than when we are alone.

95% of Our Population is Deficient in Iodine

Did you know that an estimated 95% of our population is deficient in Iodine? Do you suffer from lack of energy, headaches, irritability, muscle cramps, hair loss, brittle nails, cold hands and feet or muscle weakness? These are all symptoms of Hypothyroidism associated with low levels of Iodine.

More Vitamin D = Less Pain

You’ve heard much from us over the years about Relevit, our amazing best-selling formula that assists in reducing everyday and sports related pain and discomfort. But did you know that the vitamin D found in our Dense Bone formula is showing promise as an effective nutrient in the fight against moderate and chronic pain? According to the British Journal of Nutrition (September 2011), older men and women suffering from moderate to extreme chronic pain are likelier than others to have decreased vitamin D levels.

Prescription Pain Killers are Now the LEADING Cause of Accidental Death

According to the latest data collected by the National Center for Health statistics, poisoning, primarily by prescription drugs, has now surpassed car accidents as the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. In 2008, 41,000 Americans died from poisoning, compared to 38,000 lethal car accidents. The data, which can be found on the CDC’s web site, shows that: