Sun Exposure Reduces Blood Pressure

beautiful girl enjoying the summer sun

A little time in the sun can do more than just give you a tan; it may help reduce your blood pressure. The incidence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease correlates with latitude and increases during winter, and researchers from the University of Edinburgh set out to find out why. They hypothesized that the seasonal and latitudinal associations with hypertension could be related to the effects of the sun’s UV radiation on nitric oxide (NO) in the skin, in light of the fact that NO metabolites are abundant in human skin. In the body, NO typically has a vasodilating effect, facilitating blood flow and reducing blood pressure. In 24 healthy volunteers, irradiation of the skin with UVA lowered blood pressure with decreases in circulating NO and increases in NO metabolites. Dietary interventions to increase circulating NO had no effect on these UVA-induced changes, which suggests that the blood pressure reduction was (Read More)

Low Vitamin D Levels Increases Multiple Sclerosis Progression

mri of brain showing multiple sclerosis

New research suggests vitamin D may protect against disease activity and progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Because vitamin D deficiency is common in individuals with MS, researchers set out to determine whether serum concentrations of 25-hyrdroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), a measure of vitamin D status, would be predictive of MS progression in patients during the early stages of the disease. In a study involving 465 patients with symptoms suggestive of MS (clinically isolated syndrome), serum 25(OH)D levels were measured at the beginning of the study and again at 6, 12 and 24 months. MS progression was tracked over a five-year follow-up period, clinically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Outcomes assessed included MS relapses and disability and MRI measurements of brain volume, new active lesions and increases in lesion volume. Overall, higher 25(OH)D status was associated with reduced MS activity and a slower rate of progression. Higher 25(OH)D levels (Read More)

4 Scientific Reasons Why Hugging Is Good For You

A recent study, as reported by the Daily Mail, found that hugging on the regular is correlated with a lower risk of heart disease, can fight stress and fatigue, boosts your immune system, fights infections and can reduce depression. A study by psychologist Dr. Jan Astrom, published in the journal Comprehensive Psychology, found that hugging for a mere ten seconds has health benefits. A ten-second-hug can increase “feel-good” hormones like oxytocin. This, in turn, causes stress chemicals like cortisol to drop. “The positive emotional experience of hugging gives rise  to biochemical and physiological reactions,” said Dr. Astrom in an interview. A study from the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill found that the “heart rate increased 10 beats a minute for those without contact compared with five beats a minute for huggers.” The study looked at 100 subjects. Psychologist Karen Grewen also found that hugging reduced blood pressure. The School of (Read More)

Why Beer Could Be Good for Your Health

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That beer belly of yours might not be associated with beer at all, according to a Czech Republic study cited recently by Harvard’s Harvey B. Simon, M.D. Though most of us can agree that drinking copious amounts of beer will more than likely result in negative health effects, scientific research suggests that consuming beer in moderation can actually improve your health. Take heart, beer lovers, and consider the following rewards of kicking back with your favorite brew. Lowers Risk of Cardiovascular Disease A lower risk of cardiovascular disease has been observed in men and women who drink beer. The higher HDL levels (known as “good cholesterol”) in alcohol can be linked to this, according to Harvard researchers, who observe a consistent 25-40% reduction in risk. Having high levels of good cholesterol can be a big health boost for your heart, especially if you are able to keep levels of “bad” (Read More)

Researchers and Doctors Agree – This Spice is a Brain Health Miracle

Are you concerned about maintaining the health of your brain as you age? You’re not alone. Losing one’s memory and mental abilities to cognitive decline is something we all fear, and the current statistics on the prevalence of cognitive decline in this country are not pretty. By age 65, sadly 1 in 8 Americans will suffer from severe cognitive decline, and by age 80, an astonishing 1 in 2 will. Researchers have been working for years to develop an effective treatment. But one “miracle” drug after another has failed to live up to its promises, and it’s becoming more and more apparent that pharmaceuticals are not the solution. Unfortunately, the medical establishment is so narrowly focused on finding an elusive “cure” that scientifically proven prevention strategies are often ignored. Nature’s Brain-Protecting Miracle There are a number of natural brain protectors out there, but did you know that one herb has (Read More)

Vitamin B-Complex [INFOGRAPHIC]

Vitamin B Complex [INFOGRAPHIC]

The vitamin B complex provides important components of a healthy diet. The B vitamins can generally be found in vegetable, animal, or whole-grain food sources, as explained below. If supplementation is required, Liposomal Vitamin B Complex from the Let’s Talk Health inventory of dietary supplements is a great source for B vitamins, in a most usable liquid form for quick absorption. Here’s a helpful infographic below to help you visualize the importance of the B complex.  Vitamin B1 Thiamine Thiamine is known to aid appetite regulation and boost energy. Deficiency can cause diseases of the nervous system and dementia. B1 is found in whole-grain cereal products, particularly oatmeal and brown rice, asparagus, cauliflower, oranges, eggs, pork, and liver.  Vitamin B2 Riboflavin Riboflavin assists in the body’s metabolism, converting calories to energy. It also aids in the production of red blood cells, and promotes healthy vision and skin. Good sources for (Read More)

Slash Your Risk of Stroke by 42 Percent with Vitamin C

Oranges

Each year, over 15 million people worldwide suffer from a stroke. As the second-leading cause of disability and death in people over the age of 60, stroke is devastatingly common. Fortunately, a familiar nutrient can drastically reduce the odds of it occurring. Research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and Stroke: A Journal of Cerebral Circulation found vitamin C to be exceptionally helpful in preventing strokes. Identification and Health Consequences When blood circulation to the brain fails, either from an obstruction or blood vessel rupture, brain cells begin to die from lack of oxygen, indicating that we’ve had a stroke. The event doesn’t discriminate between race, sex or nationality – even babies within the womb can have a stroke. The three different classifications include: Ischaemic strokes, which occur when a blood vessel to the brain becomes blocked. This is the most common form, accounting for 87 percent of (Read More)

Healthy Superbowl Eats

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The Superbowl is almost here – and whether you’re hosting a party or attending a potluck, it’s important to stay on track of your health goals. Don’t let the excuse of, “That’s all that was offered,” get the best of you. Be proactive and bring a dish or two that fits in your eating plan. Whether you’re gluten-free, dairy-free, Broncos or Seahawks, we have an option for you! We surfed through some of our favorite health bloggers for recipes that would be perfect for this Superbowl.   Mini Meatballs Blog: Just Jessie B This recipe comes from one of our favorite health food bloggers, Just Jessie B. These bite-sized treats are gluten free, dairy free and 100% Paleo-friendly. The recipe below yields approximately 50 mini meatballs. Ingredients: 1 lb grass-fed ground beef 8 oz gluten free pork sausage 1 cup cashew meal 1/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk 2 eggs 2 cloves garlic, (Read More)

Taking Iodine Could Save Your Life

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Unfortunately, due to today’s environmental pollutants, iodine deficiency has become a worldwide epidemic. It’s common knowledge that pollutants cause cancer, but what many don’t know is that these pollutants cause a deficiency that can make us sick. Iodized salt–supposedly a solution to iodine deficiency– provides a false sense of security. The government RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance) of Iodine for adults is a paltry 150 mcg. (micrograms).  Noted medical doctor Guy Abraham, MD said, “RDA doses of iodine are ineffective in preventing oxidative DNA damage and have no anti-cancer effect in the body.” Did you know that doctors once considered iodine to be one of the most beneficial medicines on the planet? Iodine is utilized by every cell in the human body and a lack of iodine can make it difficult to properly detoxify the body; create thyroid dysfunction and promote cancer cell growth. With rising concerns of radiation exposure from the Fukushima nuclear power plant explosion, many (Read More)

Natural Remedies for Sleep

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According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than one-third of U.S. adults suffer from lack of sleep, routinely getting less than seven hours a night. This tossing and turning effects your cognitive function, immunity health, memory and weight. Research indicates that the harder we try to sleep, the more difficult it becomes. Because of that, a rising number of Americans are resorting to prescription sleep aids – which are linked to a 4.6 times higher risk of death and a significant increase in cancer. Among patients who were prescribed just 1-18 sleeping pills per year, the risk of death was 3.6 times higher. Rates of new cancers were 35% higher among patients who were prescribed at least 132 doses a year, compared with those who did not receive prescriptions.  Source: BMJ Open, March 2012 With today’s “go go” mentality, it’s difficult to avoid caffeinated beverages to keep us going, (Read More)