Saunas’ Heart Benefits

A good sweat in the sauna may be as beneficial for your heart as moderate exercise. That’s the finding of a new study from Finland, which investigated the effects of a 30-minute sauna session on 102 middle aged adults with at least one risk factor associated with heart disease, such as high blood pressure, obesity, or high cholesterol. When participants stepped out of a 160-degree dry-heat sauna, their blood pressure had dropped by an average of seven points and their arteries gained elasticity, reports Their heart rates had also risen, from an average of 65 beats per minute before the sauna to 81 beats after. “At the moment, we can say that sauna use is recommended, and it seems that more is beneficial,” says study co-author Tanjaniina Laukkanen. The positive effects of saunas are likely linked to heat exposure, which can widen blood vessels and improve blood flow. Sweating also (Read More)

Link Between Vitamin C & Combating Cancer

The importance of Vitamin C in combating cancer is of paramount importance. The body has two intrinsic lines of defense against the growth of a tumor, both of which involve Vitamin C. The first is our immune system. Even after the most successful surgery, radiation or chemotherapy exercise, some cancer cells are bound to remain. It is our immune system that hunts down these cells and kills them. Vitamin C is required to mobilize specialized cells that fight cancer and other infections too. Under severe duress, the immune system is challenged and needs high amounts of Vitamin C. In a nutritionally deficient body, the supplies of Vitamin C dwindle, resulting in unstoppable growth of tumors. Dr. Tony Jimenez, a world-leading pioneer in natural cancer treatments and founder of Hope for Cancer speaking of the importance of vitamin C said, “Each of us produces several hundred cancer cells every day of (Read More)

Why Supplement?

It is amazing how many people share the same experience.  When they try talking to their doctors about using vitamin and mineral supplements, they are met with condescension, laughter or belittlement. These are the same doctors mind you, that when working with a woman who has just become pregnant, insist that they take a prenatal multivitamin/mineral supplement for the health of their baby. Fortunately people are educating themselves on the value of a good quality multi-vitamin/mineral supplement because they have access to the thousands of peer-reviewed studies published every year validating the use of vitamin and mineral supplements in the prevention and treatment of disease. Despite the media frenzied attempt to discredit nutritional supplements, the latest government-sponsored survey, found that more than half of American adults take nutritional supplements and more than three-quarters of U.S. Physicians (79 percent) and nurses (82 percent) recommend dietary supplements to their patients, and a similar (Read More)

What is Inflammation?

Doctors in medical school learn that inflammation is beneficial – to a degree. “They taught us there that inflammation was, in a sense, a good thing for the body,” Blaylock says. “Redness, swelling, pain, and limited range of motion are important defense mechanisms and play a major role in the healing process.” But you can get too much of a good thin, he adds. Research shows that while inflammation can be caused by lifestyle factors – including high-sugar diets, lack of exercise, obesity, and other bad habits – it appears to be more common in some people for reasons that are genetic. Scientists from Stanford University have linked 25 genetic factors to coronary artery disease and found people with this common heart condition are most likely predisposed to the disease because they have gene variants linked to inflammation. Two physiological processes play a major role in inflammation: the immune system (Read More)

Aerobic Exercise Prevents Heart Aging

There is hope for middle-aged couch potatoes, reports Years of inactivity can take a significant toll on the heart, but new research suggests that a spell of regular aerobic exercise can make up for decades of sitting. Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center recruited 53 people between 45 and 64 who were healthy but led a sedentary lifestyle. Some of the volunteers were placed on an aerobic exercise regimen involving several 30-minute sessions each week—one high-intensity, two to three that were lighter, and one for strength training—as well as an hour of tennis, cycling, running, dancing, or brisk walking. The remaining volunteers were given a “casual” program consisting of balance training, yoga, or weight lifting three times a week. After two years, those who completed at least four aerobic workouts each week were not only markedly fitter, with an 18 percent improvement in their oxygen intake, but (Read More)

Run for your Life

Running for a couple of hours each week could reduce the risk of early death by nearly 40 percent. After analyzing existing evidence on the link between exercise and longevity, researchers calculated that one hour of running—even at a slow pace—lengthens life expectancy by seven hours. This adds up over time; people who run regularly tend to live about three years longer than their non-running peers, the study found. Co-author Duck-chul Lee cautions that these gains “are not infinite”—life expectancy improvements plateau after about four hours of running a week.

Exercise Stops Brain Shrinkage

After people turn 40, their brain shrinks by about 5 percent every 10 years. But new research suggests aerobic exercise could have a protective effect, slowing this age-related deterioration and keeping the mind sharp over time. To investigate the effects of exercise on the hippocampus, a brain region essential for creating and storing memories, an international team of researchers analyzed 14 previous studies, involving 737 people between ages 24 and 76. Some of the participants were healthy; others suffered from Alzheimer’s disease, depression, or schizophrenia. The researchers split the subjects into two groups—people who engaged in various fitness regimens for up to two years and those who didn’t exercise—and compared scans of their brains. They found that aerobic activity appeared to dramatically increase the size of the left region of the hippocampus. “When you exercise, you produce a chemical called brain-derived neurotrophic factor,” lead author Joseph Firth from Western Sydney (Read More)

New Year Resolution Hacks

Essential Tips For New Years Resolutions It is that time of year. For some, setting New Year resolutions might make you feel excited, for others, it may be a cause of undo stress or indifference. In recognition of this, it is good to have at least a loose road map for the things you would like to accomplish in the new year. It certainly should not be a standard to measure yourself by, but as an exercise in faith, intention and… more often than not, good old fashioned hard work. Here are some tips and things to remember as you set your resolutions for 2018: 1. Keep your list short and the tasks manageable. Remember we tend to “measure what we treasure”. If we say we want to exercise more and set a goal to run a marathon in 6 months, we tend to get overwhelmed and give up quickly. (Read More)

The Cost of Losing Sleep – Your Immunity

Sleep often takes a backseat to parenting or a career that requires long hours, but new research suggests that sacrificing slumber for productivity is a bad trade-off. Surveys of 22,000 Americans show that people who slept five hours or less on average weeknight were 28 percent more likely to have had a cold in the past month than those who averaged at least seven hours. Worse still, reports, the sleep-challenged subjects were 82 percent more likely to report battling the flu, pneumonia, or an ear infection. The study doesn’t prove that sleep loss increases susceptibility to infections, but researchers note that sleep deprivation does hinder infection-fighting white blood cells. Moreover, people who are chronically tired may also be less likely to exercise or follow a healthy diet. Says study author Aric Prather, “It is our hope that this work will help raise the profile of sleep as a critical (Read More)

Standing Fights Obesity

It’s well established that a sedentary existence is bad for us and that regular exercise promotes better health. Apparently, new research reveals, we don’t even have to hit the treadmill to feel better; just standing up can have significant benefits, The Washington Post reports. A five-year study of more than 7,000 adults found that people who stood for a least 25 percent of their day displayed considerably lower risk of obesity – 32 percent for men and 35 percent among women. Meanwhile, standing for half of the day reduced the likelihood of obesity among men by 59 percent, compared with 47 percent among women. It’s unclear from the data if standing directly reduces obesity risk or if people who are obese simply stand less. But the results offer another argument for logging some upright time. “Many of us have sedentary jobs and commute long hours,” says lead author Kerem Shuval (Read More)