Juicing Vs. Blending

From late night commercials to in-store demos, the battle between the health benefits of juicing and blending is heating up. While these two methods of turning vegetables and fruit into drinks share some similarities, each have its own pros and cons. Here is a quick guide to help you choose the method that is right for you. Juicing Everyone is familiar with drinking fruit juice; orange and apple juice are part of everyday eating. However, did you know you can juice any fruit or vegetable? Juicers let you get the health benefits of raw food quickly and easily. There are many great health benefits from juicing. Juiced food is digested more easily by your body than whole foods. Juicing extracts the nutrients from bulky foods into a relatively small amount of liquid, allowing micronutrients to be easily accessible to your body. Juicing is also pulp free, which will make you (Read More)

Pumpkin: A Super Food

Highly nutritious and loaded with antioxidants, pumpkins are a great super food to incorporate into your diet this fall. Usually used for decor, this under appreciated squash is one of the most beneficial foods that a person can eat. Moreover, it’s inexpensive, available year round either in its whole form or in can form, and can be used in hundreds of different tasty, yet nutritious recipes. Benefits of Eating Pumpkin: Raw pumpkin contains just 15 calories per 1/2 cup Pumpkin is  full of iron, zinc, and fiber- important nutrients for children and women Pumpkin’s bright orange color is a sign that the plant contains high amounts of vitamin C and beta carotene Pumpkins are high in lutein and zeaxanthin, which are known to reduce the risk of chronic eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts. Canned pumpkin has less fiber than fresh pumpkin, but more beta carotene.  Pumpkin seeds (Read More)

Slash Your Risk of Stroke by 42 Percent with Vitamin C

Each year, over 15 million people worldwide suffer from a stroke. As the second-leading cause of disability and death in people over the age of 60, stroke is devastatingly common. Fortunately, a familiar nutrient can drastically reduce the odds of it occurring. Research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and Stroke: A Journal of Cerebral Circulation found vitamin C to be exceptionally helpful in preventing strokes. Identification and Health Consequences When blood circulation to the brain fails, either from an obstruction or blood vessel rupture, brain cells begin to die from lack of oxygen, indicating that we’ve had a stroke. The event doesn’t discriminate between race, sex or nationality – even babies within the womb can have a stroke. The three different classifications include: Ischaemic strokes, which occur when a blood vessel to the brain becomes blocked. This is the most common form, accounting for 87 percent of (Read More)

Let’s Talk Stress [INFOGRAPHIC]

As the holidays approach,  many experience rising levels of stress and anxiety. It’s reported that 77% of Americans suffer physical symptoms of stress. The pressure of entertaining guests, traveling, maintaining relationships and performing well at work can all contribute to your stress-overload. Millions of Americans seek professional help and are encouraged to take prescription medications to find a solution. While these medications may be necessary for some, the side effects can often outweigh the benefits. In the infographic below are three products that naturally assist the body in combating stress without the side effects of prescription drugs!       Stress Eze, one of our best-selling formulas, is an all natural and non-addictive formula designed to calm you down. This formula contains St. John’s Wort,  which has been numerously reported to be as effective as some of the most frequently prescribed antidepressants, without the side-effects. L-Tyrosine, which is also found in our Stress (Read More)

Is good health contagious? A new study says yes.

There’s no magic solution for weight loss and improved health. But data collected by researchers in Kentucky shows friends and family members may lose weight more effectively by working as a team. That finding comes from a new study reported by the American Heart Association. The study’s results indicate that strong social networks, such as those among friends and relatives, help people lose weight and improve their overall health. Are healthy habits contagious? The study, undertaken by researchers in Kentucky, answers that question in the affirmative. The data showed that dieters who lost weight collectively with friends and family lost more weight and were likelier to achieve permanent results. Study organizers, working with a pool of 552 participants, assigned friends and family members into social groups of between two and eight people. The groups worked together to improve their health. Over the course of ten months, participants within social groups lost an (Read More)

5 Heart Healthy Habits

Many of the hardest things to do in life are based on good old-fashioned common sense.  So why are they so hard to accomplish? Let’s face it – in our minds we often think that change is not rational.  Our reasoning is that when we change something in our lives, that often means that we will also lose something – habits that gives us great pleasure. That is why people burn out so easily on their New Year resolutions.  As you read through these common sense behaviors that are critical to a healthy heart, remember that failure is an event – not a person.  Be willing to take risks to get out of you comfort zone. Be willing to start, create “baby steps” for change that are based in your behavior, not just your attitude.  It truly is better to act your way into a new way of thinking, rather (Read More)

Is the Flu Just a Simple Deficiency of Vitamin D?

There has been an age old question that scientists could not answer: Why is the flu most prevalent in winter? Fever, sore throat, cough, body pains and nausea all signal the onset of this debilitating condition. A fascinating new theory seeks to explain why flu takes hold during the winter months and why it infects mostly the elderly and those who are more sedentary. Dr. John Cannell is the chief author of a landmark theory that postulates that influenza epidemics are intimately linked to declining vitamin D levels. In California, Dr. Cannell works with patients at a maximum-security hospitals for the criminally insane. In recent years, he had become aware that vitamin D is a unique compound with profound effects on human immunity. He lists bone health, cancer prevention and blood pressure lowering effects as an indication that “vitamin D is really quite different from other vitamins.” Dr. Cannell postulated (Read More)

Sun Exposure Reduces Blood Pressure

A little time in the sun can do more than just give you a tan; it may help reduce your blood pressure. The incidence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease correlates with latitude and increases during winter, and researchers from the University of Edinburgh set out to find out why. They hypothesized that the seasonal and latitudinal associations with hypertension could be related to the effects of the sun’s UV radiation on nitric oxide (NO) in the skin, in light of the fact that NO metabolites are abundant in human skin. In the body, NO typically has a vasodilating effect, facilitating blood flow and reducing blood pressure. In 24 healthy volunteers, irradiation of the skin with UVA lowered blood pressure with decreases in circulating NO and increases in NO metabolites. Dietary interventions to increase circulating NO had no effect on these UVA-induced changes, which suggests that the blood pressure reduction was (Read More)

4 Scientific Reasons Why Hugging Is Good For You

A recent study, as reported by the Daily Mail, found that hugging on the regular is correlated with a lower risk of heart disease, can fight stress and fatigue, boosts your immune system, fights infections and can reduce depression. A study by psychologist Dr. Jan Astrom, published in the journal Comprehensive Psychology, found that hugging for a mere ten seconds has health benefits. A ten-second-hug can increase “feel-good” hormones like oxytocin. This, in turn, causes stress chemicals like cortisol to drop. “The positive emotional experience of hugging gives rise  to biochemical and physiological reactions,” said Dr. Astrom in an interview. A study from the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill found that the “heart rate increased 10 beats a minute for those without contact compared with five beats a minute for huggers.” The study looked at 100 subjects. Psychologist Karen Grewen also found that hugging reduced blood pressure. The School of (Read More)

Study Finds Energy Drinks Affect Heart Function

Energy drinks are incredibly popular among college students and young professionals in the United States. Ever since Red Bull popularized the concept of caffeinated drinks as an alternative to coffee, numerous other brands have joined the market, which can now be found in any supermarket or college campus in the country. Although energy drinks have been widespread for several years now, a growing number of doctors and nutritionists are concerned about the significant dangers that these energy drinks pose on the human body. Recently, a study by the Radiological Society of North America described some of the potential threats energy drinks can have on those who regularly drink them. Earlier this month, U.S. News reported on the study, which described many of the risks associated with drinking energy drinks, including: Excess sugar in the diets of energy drinkers, due to the high levels of sugar in energy drinks. Some have more sugar (Read More)