Antidepressants: The Scary Truth

Antidepressants are medications meant to act on the chemistry of the brain to relieve symptoms of depression. Along with talk therapy, antidepressants can be wonderful in helping those suffering from depression live a more normal life. However, there are often side effects from the antidepressants. According to WebMD.com, side effects can range from nausea to sexual dysfunction among others. More medications are prescribed to deal with the side effects, and even those can cause side effects, or the original medication gets changed and adjusted and the cycle starts all over again. There also is the problem with serious interactions with other drugs you may be taking. For a more complete list, visit www.drugwatch.com. Some antidepressants (such as Paxil) have even been linked to birth defects when taken by women who are pregnant. Responsible physicians will not prescribe antidepressants that have been linked to birth defects to their patients who are pregnant (Read More)

Part 3: Why Supplements?

Continued from part 2 Take Stock Of Your Life Starting Today Let’s face it – most of us do not take a personal inventory of what we eat on a regular basis to ensure proper nutrition. Even if we are diligent, much of the nutrition in the foods we eat today have been stripped of their nutritional value by over processing. Nutritional supplements are more widely used today than at any other time in our history. People are using nutritional supplements to fill the gaps between our unhealthy diets and our body’s needs, helping to enhance everything from our workout regimens as well as our memory and mental functions. The lack of proper supplementation may not be apparent; your body is amazingly equipped to keep you in balance, even when you are not providing the proper amounts of nutrients. This takes its toll on our bodies. Our bodies, unlike cars, (Read More)

Pumpkin: A Super Food

Highly nutritious and loaded with antioxidants, pumpkins are a great super food to incorporate into your diet this fall. Usually used for decor, this under appreciated squash is one of the most beneficial foods that a person can eat. Moreover, it’s inexpensive, available year round either in its whole form or in can form, and can be used in hundreds of different tasty, yet nutritious recipes. Benefits of Eating Pumpkin: Raw pumpkin contains just 15 calories per 1/2 cup Pumpkin is  full of iron, zinc, and fiber- important nutrients for children and women Pumpkin’s bright orange color is a sign that the plant contains high amounts of vitamin C and beta carotene Pumpkins are high in lutein and zeaxanthin, which are known to reduce the risk of chronic eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts. Canned pumpkin has less fiber than fresh pumpkin, but more beta carotene.  Pumpkin seeds (Read More)

5 Heart Healthy Habits

Many of the hardest things to do in life are based on good old-fashioned common sense.  So why are they so hard to accomplish? Let’s face it – in our minds we often think that change is not rational.  Our reasoning is that when we change something in our lives, that often means that we will also lose something – habits that gives us great pleasure. That is why people burn out so easily on their New Year resolutions.  As you read through these common sense behaviors that are critical to a healthy heart, remember that failure is an event – not a person.  Be willing to take risks to get out of you comfort zone. Be willing to start, create “baby steps” for change that are based in your behavior, not just your attitude.  It truly is better to act your way into a new way of thinking, rather (Read More)

Sluggish? Tired? Foggy? Iodine May Hold The Key

Maybe it’s time to rejuvenate your thyroid – that master of metabolism. When your thyroid is functioning at less that optimum, you can bet that you will feel sluggish, tired and foggy. It is estimated that as high as twenty percent of all adults have hypothyroidism that has not been clinically diagnosed. And when the condition is diagnosed, the drugs used to combat it often yield little or no results. You see, the thyroid produces four different hormones and the drug addresses only one of these by replacing it. If you had four bad tires on your car, would you only replace one? Even worse, the “hormone replacement” drug actually depresses the thyroid from producing any hormones because it begins to feel as if “someone else” is doing its job, so why work?

4 Scientific Reasons Why Hugging Is Good For You

A recent study, as reported by the Daily Mail, found that hugging on the regular is correlated with a lower risk of heart disease, can fight stress and fatigue, boosts your immune system, fights infections and can reduce depression. A study by psychologist Dr. Jan Astrom, published in the journal Comprehensive Psychology, found that hugging for a mere ten seconds has health benefits. A ten-second-hug can increase “feel-good” hormones like oxytocin. This, in turn, causes stress chemicals like cortisol to drop. “The positive emotional experience of hugging gives rise  to biochemical and physiological reactions,” said Dr. Astrom in an interview. A study from the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill found that the “heart rate increased 10 beats a minute for those without contact compared with five beats a minute for huggers.” The study looked at 100 subjects. Psychologist Karen Grewen also found that hugging reduced blood pressure. The School of (Read More)

Vitamin B12: All Cobalamins Are Not Equal

Look at your multiple vitamin or B complex bottle. You’re probably taking cyanocobalamin, the stable and less expensive form of vitamin B12. Because it is stable, it has a longer shelf life. However, the active form of B12 is methylcobalamin and the two are NOT equal in effectiveness. If you have symptoms of GI disorders, lethargy, confusion, slow thought processes, heart rate variability, atherosclerosis, sleep disorders, or immune dysfunction, you may need the methyl as well as the cobalamin component. The two vitamin B12 coenzymes known to be metabolically active in humans are methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin. Vitamin B12 is usually absorbed from the gut from the fermentation of intrinsic factor by intestinal flora. However, production can be disturbed by nutritional deficiencies, intrinsic factor deficiency, bacterial overgrowth, malabsorption, alcohol, and antibiotics. Nitrous oxide anesthesia in surgery and nitric acid from normal metabolism and inflammation also reduce our vitamin B12 levels. Cobalamins (Read More)