Size Really Does Matter

Short men and overweight women are at a distinct disadvantage when it comes to education, career opportunities, and earning potential, a new study shows. After examining the DNA of about 120,000 adults, researchers at Exeter University in England found that men who are genetically predisposed to be short generally have less schooling and lower wages than those with tall genes. For every additional 2½ inches in height resulting purely from genetics (rather than diet or economic status), a man’s annual income increases by nearly $2,300. A similar analysis of body mass index (BMI)—a measure of body fat based on height and weight—reveals that heavier women face even greater obstacles than short men. When a woman has a genetically predicted weight 28 pounds more than another woman of the same height, she is on average paid $4,300 a year less. “This is the strongest evidence by far that there is a (Read More)

Fighting Bacteria With Dirt

Scientists have discovered a new antibiotic capable of wiping out several strains of “super bugs,”including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The new class of microbe-destroying molecules, known as malacidins, was extracted from microorganisms living in dirt, suggesting new weapons against drug-resistant bacteria could be lurking right under our feet, The Washington Post reports. “Every place you step, there’s 10,000 bacteria, most of which we’ve never seen,” says lead researcher Sean Brady. “There’s this reservoir of antibiotics out in the environment we haven’t accessed yet.” The vast majority of antibiotics are produced by fungi and by bacteria themselves in their ongoing competition against one another, but only about 1 percent of these microbes can be grown in petri dishes. The researchers bypassed this problem by removing DNA from 2,000 soil samples teeming with bacteria, cloning it, and injecting it into microbes that can be cultured in a lab. These microbes produced malacidin, which destroys the cell (Read More)

Why Supplement?

It is amazing how many people share the same experience.  When they try talking to their doctors about using vitamin and mineral supplements, they are met with condescension, laughter or belittlement. These are the same doctors mind you, that when working with a woman who has just become pregnant, insist that they take a prenatal multivitamin/mineral supplement for the health of their baby. Fortunately people are educating themselves on the value of a good quality multi-vitamin/mineral supplement because they have access to the thousands of peer-reviewed studies published every year validating the use of vitamin and mineral supplements in the prevention and treatment of disease. Despite the media frenzied attempt to discredit nutritional supplements, the latest government-sponsored survey, found that more than half of American adults take nutritional supplements and more than three-quarters of U.S. Physicians (79 percent) and nurses (82 percent) recommend dietary supplements to their patients, and a similar (Read More)

How Exercise Slows Aging

If working out makes you feel younger, a new study suggests it’s no illusion- vigorous exercise can actually slow the aging process on a cellular level, turning back the clock nearly a decade. Researchers analyzed 6,000 adults based on their physical activity and biological markers of aging, Time.com reports. Most importantly, they used DNA samples to measure the length of participants’ telomeres, protein caps that protect chromosomes, like the plastic tips of shoelaces. Telomeres shrink with age – we lose bits of them every time a cell divides. “In general, people with shorter telomeres die sooner and are more likely to develop many of our chronic diseases,” says study author Larry Tucker. Taking into account risk factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and obesity, the researchers found people who exercised strenuously – say, running for 30 to 40 minutes five days per week – had longer telomeres. That gave them (Read More)

Part 1: Six Whole Foods With Super-Healing Powers

Whole foods play an important role in our health and well-being.  While there are literally hundreds of nutritious whole foods to consume, the foods listed below actually assist the body to help you heal. Emerging research demonstrates that whether it is fighting cancer, lowering your cholesterol, decreasing inflammation, preventing heart disease plus many other maladies, these super-healing foods will help you get back your health – naturally. Kiwis This tiny, nutrient-dense fruit packs an amazing amount of vitamin C (double the amount found in oranges), has more fiber than apples, and beats bananas as a high-potassium food. The unique blend of phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals found in kiwifruit helps protect against heart disease, stroke, cancer, and respiratory disease. In the world of phytonutrient research, kiwifruit has fascinated researchers for its ability to protect DNA in the nucleus of human cells from oxygen-related damage Kiwifruit’s natural blood-thinning properties work without the (Read More)

Vitamin B12: All Cobalamins Are Not Equal

Look at your multiple vitamin or B complex bottle. You’re probably taking cyanocobalamin, the stable and less expensive form of vitamin B12. Because it is stable, it has a longer shelf life. However, the active form of B12 is methylcobalamin and the two are NOT equal in effectiveness. If you have symptoms of GI disorders, lethargy, confusion, slow thought processes, heart rate variability, atherosclerosis, sleep disorders, or immune dysfunction, you may need the methyl as well as the cobalamin component. The two vitamin B12 coenzymes known to be metabolically active in humans are methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin. Vitamin B12 is usually absorbed from the gut from the fermentation of intrinsic factor by intestinal flora. However, production can be disturbed by nutritional deficiencies, intrinsic factor deficiency, bacterial overgrowth, malabsorption, alcohol, and antibiotics. Nitrous oxide anesthesia in surgery and nitric acid from normal metabolism and inflammation also reduce our vitamin B12 levels. Cobalamins (Read More)

Genetically Modified Corn, It’s Everywhere

There’s no longer any guarantee the corn you eat is actually good for you. Genetically modified corn has infiltrated many dinner tables across the nation in one form or another. GMO corn first began to be developed on a large scale two decades ago. It was introduced as a solution to make the crop able to withstand herbicides and certain varieties of insects. The corn was modified with a protein toxic to these insects and resistant herbicides used to kill off weeds. Altering corn DNA from its natural state has since opened the door to a host of medical issues.   Risks of GMO corn GMO foods have been linked to a sharp increase in autoimmune disorders and allergies. A recent study from National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), for example, found that the number of children diagnosed with food allergies has risen 50 percent since 1999. During that same period, (Read More)