Vitamin B-Complex [INFOGRAPHIC]

Vitamin B Complex [INFOGRAPHIC]

The vitamin B complex provides important components of a healthy diet. The B vitamins can generally be found in vegetable, animal, or whole-grain food sources, as explained below. If supplementation is required, Liposomal Vitamin B Complex from the Let’s Talk Health inventory of dietary supplements is a great source for B vitamins, in a most usable liquid form for quick absorption. Here’s a helpful infographic below to help you visualize the importance of the B complex.  Vitamin B1 Thiamine Thiamine is known to aid appetite regulation and boost energy. Deficiency can cause diseases of the nervous system and dementia. B1 is found in whole-grain cereal products, particularly oatmeal and brown rice, asparagus, cauliflower, oranges, eggs, pork, and liver.  Vitamin B2 Riboflavin Riboflavin assists in the body’s metabolism, converting calories to energy. It also aids in the production of red blood cells, and promotes healthy vision and skin. Good sources for (Read More)

Foods That Boost Metabolism

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Metabolism is a process used by the body for a number of benefits, such as boosting energy, breaking down fat and breaking down unhealthy chemicals in the body. Many dieters focus on eating foods that will boost their metabolism in order to lose more weight. If you are concerned over excess weight, there are a number of lifestyle changes that may be beneficial in obtaining your weight loss goal, including exercise and a healthy diet. The following foods have been shown to be beneficial in helping to speed up the metabolism. It is common for those wanting to lose weight to choose foods known as “negative calorie” foods. These types of foods trick dieters into believing that because the food does not contain calories, it is good for them. However, in order to safely lose weight you should eat foods that help produce energy, which is beneficial in digestion and (Read More)

Vitamin B12: All Cobalamins Are Not Equal

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Look at your multiple vitamin or B complex bottle. You’re probably taking cyanocobalamin, the stable and less expensive form of vitamin B12. Because it is stable, it has a longer shelf life. However, the active form of B12 is methylcobalamin and the two are NOT equal in effectiveness. If you have symptoms of GI disorders, lethargy, confusion, slow thought processes, heart rate variability, atherosclerosis, sleep disorders, or immune dysfunction, you may need the methyl as well as the cobalamin component. The two vitamin B12 coenzymes known to be metabolically active in humans are methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin. Vitamin B12 is usually absorbed from the gut from the fermentation of intrinsic factor by intestinal flora. However, production can be disturbed by nutritional deficiencies, intrinsic factor deficiency, bacterial overgrowth, malabsorption, alcohol, and antibiotics. Nitrous oxide anesthesia in surgery and nitric acid from normal metabolism and inflammation also reduce our vitamin B12 levels. Cobalamins (Read More)