Vitamin D V.S. Colorectal Cancer

Scientists have long known that vitamin D can strengthen teeth and bones by helping the body absorb calcium. Now researchers believe that high concentrations of this key micronutrient could also help prevent colorectal cancer—the third most common cancer in the U.S., killing more than 50,000 people a year. Dietary guidelines currently recommend that most adults get at least 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D a day for bone health, which can be done by eating fatty fish like salmon or trout and taking supplements or getting a judicious amount of sun exposure. But after analyzing data on more than 12,000 people in the U.S., Asia, and Europe, scientists at the American Cancer Society and other groups found that people with higher-than-recommended blood levels of vitamin D had a 22 percent lower risk of developing colorectal cancer. Those with lower-than-recommended levels, meanwhile, had a 30 percent higher risk for the (Read More)

The Benefits of Eating Fish

Concerns about mercury contamination should not dissuade Americans from eating seafood, the American Heart Association has announced. Recent research has found that large fish such as ahi tuna and swordfish contain high levels of the metal, which is toxic to the brain and nervous system. (Mercury enters the atmosphere through coal burning and other industrial activity, eventually making its way into lakes and oceans.) But studies have also found that seafood helps prevent heart disease, reports MedicalDaily.com. After reviewing all the available data, the AHA concluded that the significant cardiovascular benefits of eating fish outweigh the neurological risks. In an updated scientific advisory, the organization advises adults to consume two 3.5-ounce servings of nonfried fish every week, and specifically recommends salmon, trout, sardines, and other oily fish that are rich in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. “The benefits of fish,” says Harvard epidemiologist Eric Rimm, who chairs the group that wrote the (Read More)

Vitamin B-Complex [INFOGRAPHIC]

The vitamin B complex provides important components of a healthy diet. The B vitamins can generally be found in vegetable, animal, or whole-grain food sources, as explained below. If supplementation is required, Liposomal Vitamin B Complex from the Let’s Talk Health inventory of dietary supplements is a great source for B vitamins, in a most usable liquid form for quick absorption. Here’s a helpful infographic below to help you visualize the importance of the B complex.  Vitamin B1 Thiamine Thiamine is known to aid appetite regulation and boost energy. Deficiency can cause diseases of the nervous system and dementia. B1 is found in whole-grain cereal products, particularly oatmeal and brown rice, asparagus, cauliflower, oranges, eggs, pork, and liver.  Vitamin B2 Riboflavin Riboflavin assists in the body’s metabolism, converting calories to energy. It also aids in the production of red blood cells, and promotes healthy vision and skin. Good sources for (Read More)

Foods That Boost Metabolism

Metabolism is a process used by the body for a number of benefits, such as boosting energy, breaking down fat and breaking down unhealthy chemicals in the body. Many dieters focus on eating foods that will boost their metabolism in order to lose more weight. If you are concerned over excess weight, there are a number of lifestyle changes that may be beneficial in obtaining your weight loss goal, including exercise and a healthy diet. The following foods have been shown to be beneficial in helping to speed up the metabolism. It is common for those wanting to lose weight to choose foods known as “negative calorie” foods. These types of foods trick dieters into believing that because the food does not contain calories, it is good for them. However, in order to safely lose weight you should eat foods that help produce energy, which is beneficial in digestion and (Read More)

Vitamin B12: All Cobalamins Are Not Equal

Look at your multiple vitamin or B complex bottle. You’re probably taking cyanocobalamin, the stable and less expensive form of vitamin B12. Because it is stable, it has a longer shelf life. However, the active form of B12 is methylcobalamin and the two are NOT equal in effectiveness. If you have symptoms of GI disorders, lethargy, confusion, slow thought processes, heart rate variability, atherosclerosis, sleep disorders, or immune dysfunction, you may need the methyl as well as the cobalamin component. The two vitamin B12 coenzymes known to be metabolically active in humans are methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin. Vitamin B12 is usually absorbed from the gut from the fermentation of intrinsic factor by intestinal flora. However, production can be disturbed by nutritional deficiencies, intrinsic factor deficiency, bacterial overgrowth, malabsorption, alcohol, and antibiotics. Nitrous oxide anesthesia in surgery and nitric acid from normal metabolism and inflammation also reduce our vitamin B12 levels. Cobalamins (Read More)