Lack Of Sleep Linked To Cancer & Alzheimer’s Disease

Persistent daytime drowsiness may be a warning sign for Alzheimer’s disease, a new study suggests. During sleep, the brain clears away clumps of a sticky protein linked to dementia, called amyloid. It’s well known that people with Alzheimer’s often have trouble sleeping. To examine the link between amyloid deposits and sleep, Mayo Clinic researchers surveyed 283 older people without dementia about their sleep habits and monitored their brains for amyloid buildup over a period of seven years. They found those who reported trouble sleeping, with frequent daytime sleepiness, were more likely to show rapid amyloid plaque accumulation than those who didn’t. Study author Prashanthi Vemuri tells Time​.com that the results highlight the importance of proper sleep. “It can prevent amyloid, which is one of the primary proteins underlying Alzheimer’s disease,” he says. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than one-third of U.S. adults suffer from lack of sleep, routinely getting (Read More)

No Limit to Longevity?

If there is an upper limit to the human life span, we might not have reached it yet. The average life expectancy around the world has more than doubled since 1900, thanks to improvements in sanitation, health care, and food supply. Still, past studies have suggested that because of biological limits, only a handful of genetic outliers will live beyond 115 years old, such as the oldest verified person ever, Jeanne Calment, who died at age 122, in 1997. But a new study of nearly 4,000 Italian centenarians indicates that human longevity may be slowly increasing. According to established demographic data, after age 65, the probability of death doubles each year. The mortality rate begins to decelerate at age 80 and, the researchers found, seems to plateau at age 105. At that point, the chances of dying in a given year are roughly 50-50. Study authors say this plateauing might (Read More)

Seniors Getting Pumped

A study examined “the effect of 26 weeks of low-load high-repetition resistance training (BodyPumpTM) on maximal strength, gait speed, balance and self-reported health status in healthy, active middle-aged and older adults.”   This study divided seniors (over 55 years) into two groups, a control group and a group that “trained twice per week for 26 weeks.” At the end of the trial, researchers concluded that “low- load high-repetition resistance training in the form of BodyPumpTM is effective at improving maximal strength, gait speed and some aspects of standing balance in adults over 55 years. The training was well tolerated by the majority of participants.”    

Reducing the Risk of Dementia

Playing cards, reading books, and engaging in other mentally stimulating activities can help ward off dementia later in life, new research suggests. Scientists tracked more than 15,500 people ages 65 and over in Hong Kong for five years and routinely asked them about the “intellectual activities” they’d engaged in, including reading books and newspapers, playing board games, and even betting on horses. None of the participants had dementia at the start of the study, but by the end more than 1,300 participants had the condition, says Time​.com. Researchers found that individuals who performed intellectual activities on a daily basis had a far lower risk of developing cognitive decline than those who did them less often or not at all—even after adjusting for other factors, including physical exercise and fruit and vegetable consumption. “Given the growing older population worldwide,” the study authors write, “promoting regular engagement in intellectual activities might help delay or (Read More)

Vitamin D3 Boosts Effectiveness of Curcumin for Brain Health

New diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease cases continue to mount at an unprecedented rate, threatening both the lives of those suffering from this dreaded illness and the health care system itself, as billions are spent to care for the millions suffering from this lifestyle-mediated disease. New hope is now offered by scientists from the University of California publishing in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, as they have identified the specific intracellular mechanism regulated by vitamin D3 that may help the body clear the brain of amyloid beta.

Understanding ‘Superagers’

Scientists believe they are finally starting to unravel the secrets of so-called -superagers—senior citizens who live beyond 80 but have the mental sharpness of people decades younger. In one study, at Northwestern University, researchers who examined the brains of 10 superagers found heightened levels of Von Economo neurons, brain cells linked to social processing and awareness. Their brains had up to five times more of these cells than a typical octogenarian’s—more, even, than an average young adult’s, reports TheGuardian.com. The team also found that superagers, who they estimate account for about 5 percent of people 80 or older, are more likely to be extroverts, less likely to be neurotic, and tend to have relatively active and engaged lifestyles. A separate study, at the University of California, Irvine, examined the significance of amyloid, a protein that can lead to plaques linked to Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers found that some superagers had these (Read More)

Don’t Stop When You Retire

A sunny and stress-free retirement has long been part of the American Dream. But a new study suggests that once people ditch the daily grind, their brain function takes a dramatic nosedive, reports The Daily Telegraph (U.K.). Researchers from University College London and King’s College London monitored the brain function of about 3,400 British civil servants over 30 years, a period covering both the later part of their careers and the first 14 years of their retirement. The cognitive tests showed that the workers’ verbal memory declined 38 percent faster once they retired—a change that affected even high-ranking employees who used to have mentally challenging jobs. The researchers stress that staying mentally active and socially engaged during retirement helps protect against cognitive decline. Cary Cooper, an expert in organizational psychology from Manchester Business School in England, says that rather than just doing Sudoku or crosswords, seniors should try their hand at something (Read More)

Study: Vitamin D Deficiency May Double Risk of Dementia

Did you know Older individuals deficient in vitamin D may have double the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study published Wednesday. Researchers found that in individuals aged 65 and older, those with “low levels” of vitamin D had a 53 percent increased risk of developing dementia, while those with a “more significant deficiency had a 125 percent increased risk.” Both groups were compared to individuals with normal vitamin D levels. The key to Vitamin D is absorption. We have combined strontium and Vitamin K2 –  both clinically proven to assist the body in absorbing Vitamin D3 – in our best selling Dense Bone formula. The Vitamin D3 in each capsule is 2,000 IU so that you can modulate your dosage according to your needs. Additionally, the study found that otherwise healthy individuals with lower levels of vitamin D were nearly 70 percent more likely to (Read More)

Vitamin C Dissolves Toxic Brain Protein in Alzheimer’s Disease

Vitamin C is the most consumed vitamin in the world.  It is not only essential in building a strong immune system – its role as the chief water-soluble antioxidant in the human body adds many more benefits.  Recent studies are now linking Vitamin C in slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and memory loss.