Juicing Vs. Blending

From late night commercials to in-store demos, the battle between the health benefits of juicing and blending is heating up. While these two methods of turning vegetables and fruit into drinks share some similarities, each have its own pros and cons. Here is a quick guide to help you choose the method that is right for you. Juicing Everyone is familiar with drinking fruit juice; orange and apple juice are part of everyday eating. However, did you know you can juice any fruit or vegetable? Juicers let you get the health benefits of raw food quickly and easily. There are many great health benefits from juicing. Juiced food is digested more easily by your body than whole foods. Juicing extracts the nutrients from bulky foods into a relatively small amount of liquid, allowing micronutrients to be easily accessible to your body. Juicing is also pulp free, which will make you (Read More)

Healthy Thanksgiving Favorites

A healthy Thanksgiving might sound like an oxymoron, but we’ve put together a list of healthy, yet satisfying twists to some of the holiday classics. So even if you stuff yourself to discomfort, you can save yourself the guild trip. Try swapping several of these recipes at your Thanksgiving celebration next week. Maybe your family won’t even notice! Pear, Prosciutto & Hazelnut Stuffing Ingredients: 3 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 4 ounces prosciutto, thinly sliced, cut into ribbons 2 cups onion, chopped 2 cups diced fennel bulb 1/4 cup minced shallot 2 teaspoons minced fresh sage 2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme 1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary 8 cups stale baguette, preferably multi-grain (not sourdough), cut into 1/2-inch cubes 2 Bosc pears, ripe but firm, chopped 1/3 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley 1/3 cup chopped hazelnuts, toasted 1 14-ounce can reduced-sodium chicken broth 1/4 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper, to taste Preparation: (Read More)

Pumpkin: A Super Food

Highly nutritious and loaded with antioxidants, pumpkins are a great super food to incorporate into your diet this fall. Usually used for decor, this under appreciated squash is one of the most beneficial foods that a person can eat. Moreover, it’s inexpensive, available year round either in its whole form or in can form, and can be used in hundreds of different tasty, yet nutritious recipes. Benefits of Eating Pumpkin: Raw pumpkin contains just 15 calories per 1/2 cup Pumpkin is  full of iron, zinc, and fiber- important nutrients for children and women Pumpkin’s bright orange color is a sign that the plant contains high amounts of vitamin C and beta carotene Pumpkins are high in lutein and zeaxanthin, which are known to reduce the risk of chronic eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts. Canned pumpkin has less fiber than fresh pumpkin, but more beta carotene.  Pumpkin seeds (Read More)

Part 2: Six Whole Foods With Super-Healing Powers

Continued from Part 1 Apples The old adage – An apple a day keeps the doctor away – has real meaning for this amazing healing food. Commonly overlooked apples protect the body from nuclear fallout, kills a wide range of cancers, and keeps the arteries unclogged – plus a whole host of other healing properties.  Apples have a way to awaken your own inner physician. Apples are loaded with the powerful antioxidants quercetin and catechin, which protect cells from damage – that means a reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease, especially if you eat the skin. Research shows that the apple peel contains five times more polyphenols than the flesh. Apples and their skins pack a lot of fiber too (about twice that of other common fruits, including peaches, grapes, and grapefruit), which may help fight the battle of the bulge. In 2004, USDA scientists investigated over 100 foods (Read More)

Part 1: Six Whole Foods With Super-Healing Powers

Whole foods play an important role in our health and well-being.  While there are literally hundreds of nutritious whole foods to consume, the foods listed below actually assist the body to help you heal. Emerging research demonstrates that whether it is fighting cancer, lowering your cholesterol, decreasing inflammation, preventing heart disease plus many other maladies, these super-healing foods will help you get back your health – naturally. Kiwis This tiny, nutrient-dense fruit packs an amazing amount of vitamin C (double the amount found in oranges), has more fiber than apples, and beats bananas as a high-potassium food. The unique blend of phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals found in kiwifruit helps protect against heart disease, stroke, cancer, and respiratory disease. In the world of phytonutrient research, kiwifruit has fascinated researchers for its ability to protect DNA in the nucleus of human cells from oxygen-related damage Kiwifruit’s natural blood-thinning properties work without the (Read More)

Naturally Cheap Protein Sources

People looking to lose weight know the dangers of a diet high in carbohydrates.  If you’re looking to transform your body, then protein is perhaps the most important macronutrient you could ever have on your side. It’s the macro with the highest thermic effect of feeding (i.e. you burn calories by eating it), it helps you regulate insulin by causing the release of insulin’s “balancing” hormone, glucagon, and it provides the vital building blocks to support maintenance of your calorie burning lean muscle as you lose those stubborn pounds.

10 Benefits of Tamarind

People living in tropical Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America know that eating tamarind means eating healthy. The tamarind casually consumed in these regions has many health benefits for those who eat them. So, the next time you cruise the Asian supermarket aisles make sure to pick up a few of theses treats. The tamarind fruit is encased within a brown pod. Inside the pod of the tamarind is a soft, brown pulp with hard-coated black seeds. It is this pulp that people eat to get all the nutritional and health benefits of the tamarind. The pulp of the tamarind has a very sour taste while it is young, but as it ripens the pulp gets sweeter. Though the pulp will sweeten with age, the tamarind generally has a sour, acidic taste. In countries such as Jamaica, Mexico, Aruba and India, tamarind is mixed with sugar and sold as sweets (Read More)