Loneliness Hurts the Heart

It’s no secret that loneliness is unhealthy, physically and emotionally. Already linked to a weakened immune system, unwanted isolation also takes a toll on the heart, new research suggests. Studies following 181,000 healthy people for up to 21 years showed that those who lacked strong social ties and had few friends were 29 percent more likely to have a heart attack and 32 percent more likely to suffer a stroke, reports The New York Times. Lonely people are more apt to smoke and less likely to be active, follow a healthy diet, or visit their doctor. The findings don’t prove loneliness causes disease, but lead researcher Nicole Valtorta of the University of York in the U.K. contends it’s as significant a risk factor as anxiety and job strain, and that more efforts should be made to help isolated people make connections. “Our study shows that if this is a risk factor,” (Read More)

The Great Cholesterol Myth

 More Doctors And Researchers Speak Out About the Cholesterol Myth A recent conference entitled “Heart Disease in the 21st Century: Beyond the Lipid Hypothesis” was filled with speakers who did not believe that you should avoid saturated fats or limit your cholesterol or use polyunsaturated fats in your diet. In fact they presented evidence that was just the opposite – saturated fats are extremely important to good health, high cholesterol foods do not contribute to high cholesterol and polyunsaturated fats are bad for your health! Emerging science from intensive study on lowering cholesterol levels was found to be wanting in extending life even one day. In fact, there was a finding that lower cholesterol levels were associated with cancer and premature death! As an explanation, one speaker said, “Cardiologists and others have confusion about a statistical association of cholesterol with causation. It’s as if they saw a house burning and (Read More)

Study: Vitamin D Deficiency May Double Risk of Dementia

Did you know Older individuals deficient in vitamin D may have double the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study published Wednesday. Researchers found that in individuals aged 65 and older, those with “low levels” of vitamin D had a 53 percent increased risk of developing dementia, while those with a “more significant deficiency had a 125 percent increased risk.” Both groups were compared to individuals with normal vitamin D levels. The key to Vitamin D is absorption. We have combined strontium and Vitamin K2 –  both clinically proven to assist the body in absorbing Vitamin D3 – in our best selling Dense Bone formula. The Vitamin D3 in each capsule is 2,000 IU so that you can modulate your dosage according to your needs. Additionally, the study found that otherwise healthy individuals with lower levels of vitamin D were nearly 70 percent more likely to (Read More)

Slash Your Risk of Stroke by 42 Percent with Vitamin C

Each year, over 15 million people worldwide suffer from a stroke. As the second-leading cause of disability and death in people over the age of 60, stroke is devastatingly common. Fortunately, a familiar nutrient can drastically reduce the odds of it occurring. Research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and Stroke: A Journal of Cerebral Circulation found vitamin C to be exceptionally helpful in preventing strokes. Identification and Health Consequences When blood circulation to the brain fails, either from an obstruction or blood vessel rupture, brain cells begin to die from lack of oxygen, indicating that we’ve had a stroke. The event doesn’t discriminate between race, sex or nationality – even babies within the womb can have a stroke. The three different classifications include: Ischaemic strokes, which occur when a blood vessel to the brain becomes blocked. This is the most common form, accounting for 87 percent of (Read More)

What is Inflammation?

Doctors in medical school learn that inflammation is beneficial – to a degree. “They taught us there that inflammation was, in a sense, a good thing for the body,” Blaylock says. “Redness, swelling, pain, and limited range of motion are important defense mechanisms and play a major role in the healing process.” But you can get too much of a good thin, he adds. Research shows that while inflammation can be caused by lifestyle factors – including high-sugar diets, lack of exercise, obesity, and other bad habits – it appears to be more common in some people for reasons that are genetic. Scientists from Stanford University have linked 25 genetic factors to coronary artery disease and found people with this common heart condition are most likely predisposed to the disease because they have gene variants linked to inflammation. Two physiological processes play a major role in inflammation: the immune system (Read More)

The Cost of Losing Sleep – Your Immunity

Sleep often takes a backseat to parenting or a career that requires long hours, but new research suggests that sacrificing slumber for productivity is a bad trade-off. Surveys of 22,000 Americans show that people who slept five hours or less on average weeknight were 28 percent more likely to have had a cold in the past month than those who averaged at least seven hours. Worse still, Reuters.com reports, the sleep-challenged subjects were 82 percent more likely to report battling the flu, pneumonia, or an ear infection. The study doesn’t prove that sleep loss increases susceptibility to infections, but researchers note that sleep deprivation does hinder infection-fighting white blood cells. Moreover, people who are chronically tired may also be less likely to exercise or follow a healthy diet. Says study author Aric Prather, “It is our hope that this work will help raise the profile of sleep as a critical (Read More)

Exercise Lowers Cancer Risk

If a healthy heart and trim waistline aren’t enough incentive, maybe a lower risk for cancer will inspire sedentary people to get moving. A new study from the National Cancer Institute shows that exercise may significantly lower the risk for 13 different forms of the disease, Time.com reports. Researchers analyzed 11 years of data on the health, diet, and activity of 1.4 million people and found that a higher level of physical exertion was associated with a 7 percent lower overall chance of developing cancer. Just a few hours of weekly exercise had a particular effect on esophageal cancer, lowering the risk for the disease by 42 percent. Working out also cut the risk for lung, kidney, stomach, and endometrial cancers by more than 20 percent and significantly reduced the likelihood that people would suffer from leukemia, colon cancer, or breast cancer. The more active people were, the more their (Read More)

The Benefits of Eating Anti-Inflammatory Foods

Following a healthy diet plan requires certain health goals. At Let’s Talk Health, recognizing the different goals that individuals might make is the foundation of providing the information that is most helpful. When it comes to fighting off inflammation, the benefits to the entire body and mind are substantial. Inflammation is the gateway to almost every chronic disease.  If you reduce inflammation, you enhance your ability to fight off disease. Reduced Rates of Alzheimer’s Disease A key reason to eat an anti-inflammatory diet is improved brain health. According to numerous clinical studies, chronic inflammation is one of the causes of developing Alzheimer’s Disease and many other health conditions. By reducing inflammation by eating herbs like turmeric, the risk of developing dementia is much lower. It is the chronic inflammation in the brain, even at low levels, that destroys the health and leads to the disease. The dietary change can improve the (Read More)

What it Means to Be “Gut-Healthy”

Since commercials first started appearing on regular television about the importance of probiotics, people have increasingly been paying attention to the importance of their intestinal flora and what good gut bacteria can do for their health. Many people do not realize the far reaching effects that a healthy gut can have on their overall well being and health or how they should go about getting healthy bacteria to thrive in their gut. The Benefits of a Healthy Gut Preliminary studies have showed the benefits of healthy intestinal flora to be many and far reaching. For example, a preliminary review of the intestinal bacteria in the elderly, published by Nature, has shown that those with a varied and healthy gut were much more cognitively alert and less frail than those who did not. In other studies, the gut flora has been shown to aid digestion, help the body to produce the (Read More)