Settling the Egg Debate

You can safely eat a dozen eggs a week—or possibly more—without increasing your risk of heart disease, according to new research. Like butter and red meat, eggs are high in dietary cholesterol, and for decades many physicians advised patients to cut back on such foods to keep their heart healthy. To test the health effect of eggs, researchers at the University of Sydney put 128 people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes—a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease—on two different diets for a year. One group ate 12 eggs a week and the other ate two eggs or fewer a week. At the end of the study, the researchers found no adverse changes in cardiovascular risk factors in either group, including in blood pressure, weight, and cholesterol and blood-sugar levels, MedicalDaily.com reports. “Our research indicates people do not need to hold back from eating eggs,” study author Nick Fuller says, “if this (Read More)

Anti-Inflammatory Molecular Pathway Found in Vitamin D

We recently wrote about promising research linking Vitamin D and the reduction of chronic pain.  Now researchers have found the molecular pathway through which vitamin D inhibits inflammation. Researchers from the National Jewish Health Center in Denver reported their findings in The Journal of Immunology.  These new findings are another promising validation of the amazing properties of vitamin D.

Sluggish? Tired? Foggy? Iodine May Hold The Key

Maybe it’s time to rejuvenate your thyroid – that master of metabolism. When your thyroid is functioning at less than optimum, you can bet that you will feel sluggish, tired and foggy. It is estimated that as high as twenty percent of all adults have hypothyroidism that has not been clinically diagnosed. And when the condition is diagnosed, the drugs used to combat it often yield little or no results. You see, the thyroid produces four different hormones and the drug addresses only one of these by replacing it. If you had four bad tires on your car, would you only replace one? Even worse, the “hormone replacement” drug actually depresses the thyroid from producing any hormones because it begins to feel as if “someone else” is doing its job, so why work?

Vitamin D3 Boosts Effectiveness of Curcumin for Brain Health

New diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease cases continue to mount at an unprecedented rate, threatening both the lives of those suffering from this dreaded illness and the health care system itself, as billions are spent to care for the millions suffering from this lifestyle-mediated disease. New hope is now offered by scientists from the University of California publishing in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, as they have identified the specific intracellular mechanism regulated by vitamin D3 that may help the body clear the brain of amyloid beta.

Healing The Rusty Gate – Our Joints!

A gate is a good analogy for understanding bone joint degeneration. A new gate moves free and easy, much like healthy joints. In time, as the joint and gate hinge begin to breakdown or rust, movement becomes restricted and slower. With proper nutritional supplementation and chiropractic care, your joints can maintain proper motion. For the gate, try WD40. :-)


Critical Vitamin C Absorption Facts

Did you know that vitamin C intravenous infusions range in price from $125 to $160 per treatment? Yes, you read that right. There is a reason that many people desire to maximize the absorption of vitamin C for general health or when battling a chronic disease. The sad truth is, even the best liquid or capsule form of vitamin C is only absorbed at 19-22%. Liposomal delivery allows you to have the best of both worlds – High absorption of vitamin C in the bloodstream without the expense of IV infusions.  Plus you can determine how often and how much vitamin c you take without needing to set an appointment (not to mention – a needle stick) every time you get an infusion. The liposome protects the vitamin C as it goes through the digestive tract so that it is intact as it enters the blood stream.  In addition, because (Read More)

Diet Linked to Arthritis

Having a bad diet may increase your chances of developing osteoarthritis. Scientists have long thought the condition was tied to obesity and excessive stress placed on the joints, reports MedicalDaily.com. But in a new study, a team from the University of Rochester Medical Center found that a high-fat Western diet caused mice not only to gain weight but also to develop systemic inflammation and an imbalance in their gut microbiome: Their colons had high levels of harmful bacteria and hardly any beneficial “probiotic” bacteria. When the researchers tore cartilage in the rodents’ knees to trigger osteoarthritis, the disease progressed more rapidly in the obese mice. When they then treated these mice with a probiotic to restore their gut microbiome, the rodents had less inflammation and their joint health improved. Study author Eric Schott says his team’s findings “set the stage to develop therapies that target the microbiome and actually treat (Read More)

Night Owls May Live Shorter Lives

People who habitually stay up late are more likely to die early, a new study has found, perhaps because their internal body clock is out of sync with a society that favors early risers. Researchers tracked about 430,000 adults between 38 and 73 years old for 6.5 years. They found that night owls had a 10 percent greater risk of early death than those who prefer to wake up early, Vox.com reports. Those who burned the midnight oil were more likely to have chronic health issues, such as diabetes, neurological disorders, and respiratory disease. One possible reason, says study author Kristen Knutson, is that the pressure to conform to other people’s work and social schedules leaves late risers anxious, sleep deprived, and feeling as if they live in a perpetual state of jet lag. “There’s a problem for the night owl who’s trying to live in the morning-lark world,” Knutson (Read More)

A Deeper Look Into Vitamin C

Vitamin C, it’s everywhere. Daily vitamins, cold remedies and orange juice are all full of this ingredient, and most people accept that it’s good for them. But how many people realize the full potential of vitamin C in multiple areas of their health and life? Who takes the time to research the wondrous effects that this vitamin really has? By Any Other Name Vitamin C is sometimes known by another name: ascorbic acid. Of course, no matter what you call it, vitamin C is still beneficial. It’s been the case for hundreds of years. Sailors, for instance, would fight of scurvy with a healthy dose of the stuff. Scientists now realize that ascorbic acid helps create collagen in the skin. This protein is necessary to give strength and blood vessels strength and firmness, while vitamin C helps skin create scar tissue. It might not be pretty, but it does help (Read More)

Inflammation Triggers Chronic Disease

The presence of inflammation is what opens the door to most chronic disease.  It can and often does occur for years before it exists at levels sufficient to be apparent or clinically significant. More than half of Americans suffer from chronic or recurrent pain, and nearly half (46 percent) of poll takers reported pain in the last two weeks.  Is it any wonder that chronic disease is such a big issue?  Inflammation is now recognized as an overwhelming burden to the healthcare status of our population and the underlying basis of a significant number of diseases. How long it has been smoldering really determines the degree of severity of a disease and often the prognosis assuming the inflammation can be controlled. One could also argue that without inflammation most disease would not even exist. Take a look at this list of diseases and their relationship with inflammation: Disease Mechanism Allergy 4 (Read More)